Spring 2015 Schedule

PDP Register 

New Professional Development Courses for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Fellows!

The JHU Center for Leadership Education (CLE) is pleased to announce a suite of

Professional Development Modules specifically designed for

Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Fellows!

Spring 2015 Schedule

 

1st Half of Spring Semester: January 26 through March 13

 

663.615   Visual Rhetoric, First 7 Weeks of spring semester, Thursday, 3:00 – 5:30 pm, O’Donnell

This course teaches techniques in visual communication geared to suit emerging scientists. Students will learn the fundamentals of visual design, including theories of form, color and visual perception. The course will cover principles of typography, grid systems and other methods of establishing visual hierarchy. There will also be a short unit on commercial photography. Students will put this knowledge to work in the classroom to produce slides, conference posters and data visualizations.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

 

663.630  Business Creation and Contracts

First 7 Weeks of spring semester, Tuesday, 6:00 – 8:30 pm, Galvez

Businesses are legal entities with obligations and “rights” to be exercised.  Some of these practices and issues are addressed in this module as students explore corporation law.  In addition to elements of contracts, students will study business structures and investigate employment law issues. Expect presentations, cases and discussion.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

 

663.645.02   Improving Presentation Skills for Scientists and Engineers

First 7 Weeks of spring semester, Wednesday, 3:00 – 5: 30 pm, Homewood, Reiser

This course is designed to help scientists and engineers improve their oral presentation skills in a practice-intensive environment.  Students will learn how to hone their message, to craft presentations that address both technical and non-technical audiences, and create clear, compelling PowerPoint presentations. All presentations will be recorded for self-evaluation, and students will receive extensive instructor and peer feedback.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

 

663.654   Commercializing Your Invention or Idea

First 7 Weeks of spring semester, Thursday, 3:00 – 5:30 pm, Homewood, Reiter

It is one thing to have an idea and quite another to move the idea from idea and basic research to use in the world of business or manufacturing. This course addresses the process and skills required to make that transition. Among the topics addressed in this class are the following: recognizing the potential of ideas, addressing the patent landscape, understanding markets, determining resource requirements, design and prototypes, and finding financing.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

663.656   Developing and Managing Websites

First 7 Weeks of spring semester, Tuesday, 3:00 –5:30 pm Homewood, Graham

Explore how to develop and manage a website that supports an organization’s goals and objectives. This holistic approach to websites will include case studies, application-oriented exercises,  and group assignments. Each student will develop a professional WordPress website, employing strategies for meeting organizational goals and customer needs, using best practices for engagement and design, and creating systems for successful management and revision.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

663.660   Managing People and Resolving Conflict

First 7 Weeks of spring semester, Homewood, Wednesday, 3:00 – 5:30 pm, Homewood, Rice

Ever had to deal with a difficult person at work or in the lab? Have you been a member of a team on which team dysfunction was so bad that it make television sitcoms look normal? Why are some companies much more productive and pleasant to work with than others? Do you understand techniques of persuasion and how to participate effectively in negotiations? These topics are among the ideas we develop and practice in this class, using a combination of seminar style reading and discussion, lecture and in-class activity. The course meets once a week for 7 weeks.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

663.666  Managing Personal Finances

First 7 Weeks of spring semester, Thursday, 3:00 – 5:30 pm, Homewood, Leps

The class in Managing Personal Finance is designed to familiarize the student with the basic concepts and quantitative techniques of personal financial planning and financial literacy. The course begins with a discussion of budgeting and the time value of money and moves on to the basic principles of financial planning in the areas of taxation, consumer credit, housing decisions, insurance, investing fundamentals and retirement planning.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

 

2nd Half of Spring Semester: March 23 through May 8

 

663.631 Intellectual Property Law

Second 7 Weeks of spring semester, Wednesday, 6:00 – 8:30 pm, Jeffers

Intellectual property law grants the owners of inventions, phrases, symbols and products certain exclusive rights to use and protection of the entity. The law includes patents, copyright a trademark protection and has gained increasing importance with the current emphasis on entrepreneurship and inventions. This class explores the process and rights associated with intellectual property law. Expect presentations, cases and discussion.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

 

663.640  Writing Proposals That Win

Second 7 Weeks of spring semester, Wednesday, 3:00 – 5:30 pm, Rice

Almost regardless of professional setting, proposals are used to secure work. They are the basis of funding in consulting, academic research, many social enterprises, business-to-business commerce, and government contracting. They require huge amounts of time and energy, yet success is far from guaranteed. In this module, you will master some of the techniques required for proposal writing success. Among the topics addressed are funding sources, writing skills that work, required content for all proposals, creating one voice in shared documents, dealing with “best-and-final negotiations and other important topics. Expect to complete several writing assignments for class including at least part of your own proposal.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

 

663.662   Setting Up and Operating Your Own Lab

Second 7 weeks of spring semester, Thursday, 3:00 – 5:30 pm, Homewood, CLE Faculty

Directing and managing a lab effectively requires attention to activities ranging from leading and working with people to finding financial support to publishing papers. Many of these activities require skills that are not intuitive, and in fact require specific concentrated attention.  This course addresses many of these skills through topics such as managing teams, dealing with time pressures and stress, budgeting for the non-financial manager, mentoring, and getting published.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

 

663.670  Project Management

Second 7 Weeks of spring semester, Monday, 3:00 – 5:30 pm, Homewood, Oliver

Projects are temporary activities devised to achieve very specific goals in a designated timeframe for a specified amount of resources. Often they involve disparate activities, frequently separated by distance and sometimes involving different staff and materials. For the project to successfully meet its objectives, all these items must be planned, coordinated and orchestrated. This module explores the processes and tools available to those who must manage projects to optimize outcomes within the primary constraints of time, quality, scope and budget. Class time involves presentations, examples and discussion.  This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.

 

663.671  Leading Change

Second 7 Weeks of spring semester, Friday, 10:00 am – 12:30 pm, Homewood, Smedick

Course Overview: Change happens, like it or not!! It is necessary for progress and the result of innovation, yet change makes individuals and organizations so uncomfortable that most people and groups within organizations vigorously resist change. So the questions become how to cause, how to embrace and how to lead constructive change in ourselves, our organizations and our communities – in ways that colleagues and would-be colleagues support and contribute toward success.

The primary format for learning in this course is seminar style with reading, researching and sharing of information as well as structured, experiential activities designed to build skills through practice and interpersonal exchange. Class time is devoted to discussion, observation, feedback, additional exercises and presentation. Additionally, participants engage in reflection and explanation of their considerations as the course progresses. Further, participants read several texts and articles as well as perform extensive research in preparation for assignments.   This is a 7-week course and is not open to undergraduates.


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