Summer 2018

Two Elected to National Academy of Engineering At WSE

Jennifer Elisseeff, professor of biomedical engineering, and Charles Meneveau, professor of mechanical engineering, were among 83 new members, along with 16 foreign members, elected into the 2018 class.

In Memoriam: Remembering Murray Sachs At WSE

Sachs’ research on how the brain receives and processes sound paved the way for the development of cochlear implants, electronic devices that deliver a sense of sound to people with hearing loss.

Sign of the Times At WSE

Johns Hopkins University has purchased Baltimore’s historic Stieff Silver complex, making a highly visible symbol of the city’s manufacturing heritage a part of its future in the knowledge economy.

New MINDS for Big Data At WSE

Johns Hopkins has launched an interdisciplinary institute aimed at developing the mathematical theories that will hasten the analysis of the massive amounts of data being used to study everything from the inner workings of the human cell to the structure of the universe.

Fun With ‘Robo-Bugs’ At WSE

One robot that can retrieve objects drifting into deep water using a whirligig beetle’s swimming ability. Another that can deliver letters and greeting cards with the speed and grace of a dragonfly. Both were among the “Robo-Bugs” imagined and designed by third graders at Barclay Elementary/Middle School last fall.

‘Bronze Johns’ Get a Face-lift At WSE

A small-scale bust of Mr. Johns Hopkins—the so-called Bronze Johns—has been awarded to distinguished alumni and friends of the institution for their outstanding service to the university since 1973. However, over the 45-year legacy of the Heritage Award, the statuette masters—the original sculptures that casting molds are made from—have deteriorated.

Your Brain on Engineering Impact

Engineering principles have influenced a variety of areas, but one that remains relatively untouched is the human brain. Archana Venkataraman aims to change that.

Securing the Power Grid Impact

A cyber attack disabling America’s power grid would be catastrophic. New software developed at Johns Hopkins could help mitigate that risk.

Of Paper and Permeability Impact

For decades, preservationists have helped protect historic documents, such as centuries-old maps, by placing them in clear envelopes. Enclosing them in these clear envelopes provides mechanical support to help keep these old, brittle treasures from crumbling while also allowing the public to see and sometimes handle them. But paper degradation isn’t a self-contained event, says Patricia McGuiggan.

Upstarts: A New Focus for Solar Cells Impact

Next-generation materials for solar cells are cheap, flexible, and transparent, attributes that give them potential for creating films to coat windows or buildings. But defects that accumulate at large scales prevent them from being used for practical power generation.

Upstarts: Fine-tuning Gas Sensing Impact

Having sensitive, lightweight, and portable gas-sensing systems could be helpful for a variety of different users: people with asthma searching for their triggers, soldiers at risk of chemical attack, or industrial workers facing toxic gas exposures.

Upstarts: A New Way to See Impact

Johns Hopkins engineers are developing a new kind of camera to help self-driving vehicles better detect obstacles and surrounding traffic and prevent accidents.

C-Arms Bring 3-D to the OR Impact

Jeff Siewerdsen and his team are advancing imaging technologies that will make surgery more precise and improve patient safety.

Tech Tools: Getting Under Your Skin Impact

Stand in front of this “magic mirror,” and it seems to peer beneath your skin, revealing bones, major organs, blood vessels, and muscles.

So Long, Equations; Goodbye, Variables Impact

Yannis Kevrekidis and his collaborators work on algorithms that exploit data to enhance, or even circumvent, conventional modeling of chemical and biological systems, and help scientists better predict system behavior—from reaction rates to materials properties.

Averting Deadly Arrhythmias Impact

Arrhythmias linked to sudden cardiac death are very rare, making it difficult to study how they occur—and how they might be prevented. To make it much easier to discover what triggers this deadly disorder Johns Hopkins scientists constructed a powerful new computer model that replicates the biological activity within the heart that precedes sudden cardiac death.

Shape-Changing Soft Robots Impact

Biochemical engineers at Johns Hopkins University have used sequences of DNA molecules to induce shape changing in water- based gels, demonstrating a new tactic to produce soft robots and “smart” medical devices that do not rely on cumbersome wires, batteries, or tethers.

Trending: Summer 2018 Impact

Notable quotes and comments from Johns Hopkins Engineering faculty members.

Modern Day Miners Features

There’s treasure in all those tweets and Google searches we send out into cyberspace each day, says Mark Dredze.

All Ears Features

Why the echolocating brown bat is an ideal model for deciphering the complexities of the way humans perceive sound.

Medicine’s Problem-Solvers Features

Through their work in hospitals and labs, Johns Hopkins engineering undergrads come up with real-world solutions that are critical to improving patient care.

Wind Power’s Smooth Operators Students

Fleets of small fossil-fuel power plants typically smooth those fluctuations. But could wind farms themselves provide that service?

A Hackathon with Humanitarian Aims Students

At the first-ever virtual Humanitarian Design Hackathon at Johns Hopkins, student groups have been tasked with generating a solution to a problem or need faced mainly by Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

Asteroid Architecture Students

Knowing whether an asteroid is a giant hunk of rock or a floating gravel pile—or a mix of the two—will make a big difference in strategies that researchers might devise to prevent one from striking Earth or to drill inside.

Go Figure Students

In a class fondly known as Senior Lab, chemical and biomolecular engineering students begin to transform from passive receivers of knowledge into engineers who troubleshoot equipment quirks and adjust experiments on the fly.

Pizza’s Here! Students

A team of eight undergraduate and graduate engineering students are developing a system that can shuttle food to hungry customers across the Johns Hopkins Homewood campus.

JHU Brand Ambassador Students

Clark Kent has Superman. Peter Parker has Spider-Man. And Justin Stith has Jay. The Johns Hopkins Blue Jay, that is.

Priming the Pump Students

Residents of the tiny Guatemalan village of Chicorral used to struggle up and down a steep ravine to fetch water from a stream for cooking, bathing, and drinking. Thanks to a solar-powered pump installed a few years ago by Johns Hopkins engineers, water now comes directly into their homes via a pipe.

Hot Commodities Alumni

KITT.AI has drawn global attention for its pioneering work in natural language processing—algorithms that recognize spoken language.

The New World of ‘Superfans’ Alumni

In “Superfandom,” Zoe Fraade-Blanar and Aaron Glazer describe a symbiotic world where brand owners and brand consumers have converged —a world in which a new class of “superfans” have more clout than ever to shape the brands they love.

Old Yet Hip Alumni

Furniture company Hugo & Hoby is finding success with its old-yet-hip guidelines—locally sourced, sustainable materials, local fabricators, durable and beautiful design, and close personal relationships with both clients and makers.

Toward More Adaptable Cellphones Alumni

Cellphones that seamlessly work on any network would make lives easier for international travelers. Alyssa Apsel, PhD ’03, is designing inexpensive, flexible radio systems to help make that possible.

Start Preparing for the Next Hurricane Irma Back Talk

It’s time to stop using the words “unprecedented” or “one in a pick-your-large-number-year flood” to fool ourselves into believing that we’re experiencing one-off weather that can’t be defended against.

From the Dean From The Dean

The pace of change here is almost dizzying. In the last year alone, the Whiting School’s footprint on Homewood campus—and slightly beyond—has increased by 20 percent, allowing us to expand our critical core research facilities and world-class laboratories, and add more space for centers and institutes.