Impact

Summer 2018

Your Brain on Engineering

Engineering principles have influenced a variety of areas, but one that remains relatively untouched is the human brain. Archana Venkataraman aims to change that.

Summer 2018

Securing the Power Grid

A cyber attack disabling America’s power grid would be catastrophic. New software developed at Johns Hopkins could help mitigate that risk.

Summer 2018

Of Paper and Permeability

For decades, preservationists have helped protect historic documents, such as centuries-old maps, by placing them in clear envelopes. Enclosing them in these clear envelopes provides mechanical support to help keep these old, brittle treasures from crumbling while also allowing the public to see and sometimes handle them. But paper degradation isn’t a self-contained event, says Patricia McGuiggan.

Summer 2018

Upstarts: A New Focus for Solar Cells

Next-generation materials for solar cells are cheap, flexible, and transparent, attributes that give them potential for creating films to coat windows or buildings. But defects that accumulate at large scales prevent them from being used for practical power generation.

Summer 2018

Upstarts: Fine-tuning Gas Sensing

Having sensitive, lightweight, and portable gas-sensing systems could be helpful for a variety of different users: people with asthma searching for their triggers, soldiers at risk of chemical attack, or industrial workers facing toxic gas exposures.

Summer 2018

Upstarts: A New Way to See

Johns Hopkins engineers are developing a new kind of camera to help self-driving vehicles better detect obstacles and surrounding traffic and prevent accidents.

Summer 2018

C-Arms Bring 3-D to the OR

Jeff Siewerdsen and his team are advancing imaging technologies that will make surgery more precise and improve patient safety.

Summer 2018

Tech Tools: Getting Under Your Skin

Stand in front of this “magic mirror,” and it seems to peer beneath your skin, revealing bones, major organs, blood vessels, and muscles.

Summer 2018

So Long, Equations; Goodbye, Variables

Yannis Kevrekidis and his collaborators work on algorithms that exploit data to enhance, or even circumvent, conventional modeling of chemical and biological systems, and help scientists better predict system behavior—from reaction rates to materials properties.