Faculty

Sharon Gerecht

PROFESSOR
KENT GORDON CROFT INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT FACULTY SCHOLAR

Director, Institute for NanoBio Technology (INBT)

Joint Appointment: Oncology, School of Medicine

Secondary Appointment: Materials Science and Engineering

Ph.D. Bioengineering, Israel Institute of Technology (’04)

Research Interests

  • 3D Culture Environments
  • Stem Cell Self Renewal and Differentiation
  • Tissue Engineering

Professor Gerecht was a postdoctoral researcher in 2004 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Israel Institute of Technology. She received her Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the Israel Institute of Technology (’04), M.Sc. in Medical Sciences from Tel-Aviv University (’99), and B.A. in Biology from the Israel Institute of Technology (’94).

Her group’s research is focused on employing engineering fundamentals to study basic questions in stem cell biology and applying these to tissue repair and regeneration. Specifically, they study the interactions between stem cells (SCs) and their microenvironments with the long-term goal of engineering artificial SC microenvironments capable of guiding vascular differentiation, delivery, and regeneration. Their research program is based on the integrated and advanced use of tissue engineering system components and is grounded in fundamentals of interfacial science and engineering and SC biology.

Professor Gerecht is the director of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBio Technology (INBT), a diverse, multidisciplinary team of faculty, researchers, and student experts uncovering new knowledge and creating innovative technologies at the interface of nanoscience, engineering, and medicine. Launched in 2006, INBT aims to revolutionize research by fostering a collaborative environment among engineers, scientist, and clinicians to pioneer new ways to solve some of the most complex challenges in healthcare and the environment. It brings together experts from the Bloomberg School of Public Health, School of Medicine, Whiting School of Engineering, Applied Physics Lab, and Krieger School of Arts and Sciences.

Back to top