Summer 2006

Innovation by Example Tomorrow's Trailblazers

In a fun, hands-on way, the Whiting School leads the vital effort to engage young students in exploring engineering. THE CHALLENGES OF THE 21ST CENTURY—developing alternative energy sources, promoting sustainable development, managing threats to the environment, defeating human diseases, to name a few— will be solved by innovators, inventors, and creators. In short, it is…

Sophisticated Science in a Schoolyard Tomorrow's Trailblazers

Grad student Sam Small deploys a remote sensing project at Poly to give high school students in-depth experience with environmental monitoring. “GET STUDENTS INVOLVED in novel science, math, and technology experiences in the K-12 classroom, and they’ll be interested in studying engineering when they go to college,” explains Sam Small, a third-year PhD student in…

Pumping Water Globally, Saving Energy Locally Making Waves

Whether designing low-tech irrigation for villages or giving away halogen lightbulbs at Homewood, students go the distance for a sustainable world. LAST JANUARY, Richard Tang ’06, a Biomedical Engineering major, stood in a stream bed in rural South Africa, examining an old tire filled with rocks and weeds. At first glance, it seemed to be…

On the Fast Track Making Waves

Undergraduate entrepreneurs collaborated on designing a non-invasive kidney test and on developing a business plan for it. DETECTED EARLY, kidney failure can be reversed. But the existing blood-based testing can take 24 to 48 hours—a dangerously long time. To reduce that time significantly for patients in intensive care, two undergraduates in the Whiting School of…

A Composite of Many Talents Making Waves

Classical piano…math…creative writing, and now functionally graded materials. For doctoral student Katherine Acton, life has many layers. ALTHOUGH SHE IS WORKING toward a PhD in Civil Engineering at the Whiting School, engineering was not Katherine Acton’s first love. It is just one of a long line of accomplishments. Acton’s first love was classical piano, which…

Let’s Think Small Features

With the tiniest particles, probes, and therapeutic agents, Johns Hopkins nanobiotechnology researchers are set to supersize their efforts to advance medicine, engineering, biology, and public health. NANOTECHNOLOGY IS A PARADOX, for even the smallest bit of matter can have the most profound impact. Thanks to silicon, ever-smaller manufacturing technology has revolutionized electronics. The next frontier…

Excellence Applied to the Workforce Features

SEVERAL YEARS after he joined the senior professional staff at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in 1973, Allan W. Bjerkaas began teaching in the Hopkins programs for working engineers, now known as the Whiting School’s Engineering and Applied Science Programs for Professionals (EPP). He has taught in the programs in Applied Physics, in…

The Next Revolution in Research Features

In the Computational Sciences and Engineering Building, a multidisciplinary exploration will take on smart robotics, massive data crunching, and more. RIGHT NOW, the next launch pad for groundbreaking research at the Whiting School of Engineering looks like nothing more than a chaotic construction site. However, in the fall of 2007, a new kind of building…

10-Gallon Tribute Alumni up front

Albert H. Halff ’50 PhD, founder of a prominent Dallas-based firm, recalls the wellspring of his passion for environmental engineering. IN 1950, when Albert H. Halff received his PhD in Sanitary Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University, he gained something else of great value in that field: first-hand exposure to Abel Wolman ’13, ’15. The…

A Beacon on Wall Street Alumni up front

Morgan Stanley executive Marshal L. Salant ’80 actively recruits Johns Hopkins students to learn and earn in the world of finance. MARSHAL L. SALANT ’80 was in the first class to graduate from the newly formed Whiting School of Engineering. With a degree in Mathematical Sciences and an interest in economics, he replied to an…

ALUMNI AWARDS Alumni up front

Distinguished Alumnus Award Established in 1978, this award honors alumni who have typified the Johns Hopkins tradition of excellence and brought credit to the University through their personal accomplishments, professional achievement, or humanitarian service. The following three Whiting School of Engineering alumni were honored in 2005. William “Bill” R. Bowles ’60 retired in 1999 from…

“Reds” Wolman ’49 Receives Benjamin Franklin Award back on campus

THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE in Philadelphia in April awarded M. Gordon “Reds” Wolman ’49 a prestigious Benjamin Franklin Medal for his contributions to modern water-resource management. As part of the week of festivities in Philadelphia celebrating the laureates, Wolman spoke on “Fluvial Processes in Geomorphology and Environmental Management” at the Symposium on Earth and Environmental Science….

Five Faculty and Alumni Elected to NAE back on campus

TWO WHITING SCHOOL of Engineering faculty members and three alumni were elected to the prestigious National Academy of Engineering (NAE). This recognition is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. The induction ceremony will take place next October in Washington, D.C. The two faculty members elected in February were: • Robert A. Dalrymple,…

Three Notable Alumni Who “Pay it Forward” the wider world

IN THE 1950s, one in three Engineering undergraduates at the Johns Hopkins University received a Maryland State Senatorial Scholarship. These scholarships, which covered as much as full tuition, were provided to the University through a legislative appropriation that had begun when the Engineering school opened its doors in 1913. Each state senator could award scholarship…

Mutually Attracted to Modeling Connections

WHEN T. ROWE PRICE, the global investment management firm headquartered in Baltimore, went looking for qualified college seniors for its highly competitive two-year Investment Fellowship Program, it did not have to go far. The firm came to the Whiting School of Engineering. This June, Eric Chu ’06 and Prashant Jey ’06, both of whom majored…

Where Energy Companies Find Energetic New Hires Connections

IN EARLY MARCH, representatives from Shell Oil, Baltimore Gas & Electric, and Constellation Energy came to the Homewood campus to hold employment informational sessions for undergraduates. “We had a good turn-out,” says Lani Hummel, director of the Office of Industrial Initiatives at the Whiting School of Engineering. Students enjoyed meeting with representatives from the companies’…

Tiny Cubes May Hold Huge Potential Lab Notes

David H. Gracias fabricates metal microcontainers that one day could deliver drug therapies or relay health information from inside the body. MEDICATIONS CAN ENTER the human body in many ways. In liquid form, they can be injected into the bloodstream. As a tablet or capsule, they can be swallowed. In tiny particle form, they can…

Getting the Pollutant Priorities Straight Lab Notes

In their hunt for emerging contaminants in the water supply, A. Lynn Roberts and Edward J. Bouwer probe beyond the usual suspects. WITH ABOUT 80,000 CHEMICALS being produced in the United States, even the most diligent environmental watchdogs have to prioritize the list of pollutants to be monitored and regulated. In the 1970s, when the…