Fall 2002

Engineering Electrifies Art Making Waves

In the wired worldview of Wesley Smith ’02, the scientific method becomes the first step toward artistic expression. Wesley Smith ’02 creates the circuits to connect art and engineering; he’s drawn more to the similarities between the disciplines than to their differences. The Dallas, Texas, native double-majored in electrical engineering and French. He received the…

Geared for Greatness Making Waves

That Spandex blur is Scott Burkholder ’02, speeding from engineering to oncology research. To say that Scott Burkholder ’02 is on a roll would not only be a pretty bad pun, it would also be a gross understatement. The chemical and biomedical engineering double major—who now works as lab technician conducting oncology research at the…

Part-time Engineering, Full-time Passion Features

Few professions face such rapid change and transformation as engineering, so it should come as no surprise that the Johns Hopkins Part-time Programs in Engineering and Applied Science (PTE) are among the fastest growing at the University. With education centers around Maryland and in Washington, DC, PTE serves a student body of some 2,200 working…

Three Rollouts That Highlight Students’ Solutions Features

The Class of 2002 produced a number of outstanding solutions in the Senior Design Project course. Here are three of them. A Greater Grasp of Life For an anonymous client, everyday life was literally moving out of reach. Suffering from an extremely rare degenerative muscle disorder called inclusion body myositis, he could still control the…

Innovation by Design Features

Seniors solve real-world problems with teamwork Quick—how long does it take 35 Whiting School students to crack a dozen conundrums in mechanical engineering? “Exactly 31 weeks,” says Senior Lecturer Andrew F. Conn ’57, ’59 MSE, ’64 PhD. “It’s not a lot of time.” Indeed, the clock is ticking from that first day in September when…

W.B.Kouwenhoven: Reviving the Body Electric Features

Acclaimed as the “father of cardiopulminary resuscitation” (CPR), William B. Kouwenhoven devoted 50 years to inventing the procedures and devices to jolt a human heart back to life. Even with the numerous testimonials, national awards, and articles about William Bennett Kouwenhoven, it is difficult to encounter the man behind the biographical facts. His resolute face,…

Alumni Awards Alumni up front

The Heritage Award Established in 1973, this award honors alumni or friends of the Johns Hopkins University who have contributed outstanding service over an extended period to the progress of the University and the activities of the Alumni Association. The following two individuals were awarded this honor in 2002. A. James “Jim” Clark, a trustee…

A Luncheon with Leaders: The Whiting Legacy Circle Alumni up front

Whiting Legacy Circle members gathered on March 14 at the Homewood campus for their sixth annual meeting. George S. Jenkins, II ’43, ’47 MSE, chairs the group, whose members have remembered the Whiting School in their will, created a life income gift arrangement, or established another estate planning mechanism. At their luncheon with leaders of…

A Top “Dolphin” in Classroom and Boardroom Alumni up front

“I’ve used my engineering skills in the broadest sense: from the B-1 Bomber to FEDEX,” says Suzanne Jenniches ’79 MSE from her office at Northrop Grumman Corporation in Baltimore, where she is vice president of the Communications Systems business unit. “I began working here as a test engineer in 1974. Although I moved around a…

Power Player Alumni up front

Lorne Guild ’32 remembers his years as an electrical engineering major as “working in the lab mornings and afternoons, then again on Saturday mornings. Then I would go play lacrosse.” And how he played! Guild was a three-time All-American, and twice named to the First Team (in 1931 and 1932). He played on the 1932…

Over-achieving Gracefully Alumni up front

“I’m just a regular person doing my job,” says Georgette Gaskin ’90. Well, maybe. In February, she was named 2002 Black Engineer of the Year in the category of Outstanding Technical Contribution in Government. The award honors Gaskin’s leadership of the adhesives and sealants team for the Navy’s aircraft division. Sponsored by Lockheed Martin Corporation…

Great Improvements Are Taking Shape on Campus back on campus

All summer long, the Great Excavations-2 project on the Homewood campus continued to make progress, and everyone seemed to find creative ways to get around the construction. In addition to beautifying the campus, the goal of the project is to make the campus more pedestrian- friendly and improve traffic circulation. One key improvement is in…

Studying Prescription Drug Pollution in the Nation’s Waterways back on campus

“Over the past few years, scientists in Europe have found pharmaceuticals in natural waterways, sewage treatment effluents, and even in drinking water,” says A. Lynn Roberts, associate professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering (DoGEE). “Yet until very recently this issue has been largely overlooked in the United States,” she adds. Roberts is…

Dean Busch-Vishniac to Step Down Next Year back on campus

Ilene Busch-Vishniac will step down as dean of the Whiting School of Engineering as of June 30, 2003, the end of her five-year term. She will remain at the School as a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Hopkins President William R. Brody, in accepting her decision with regret, noted that next year, Busch-Vishniac…

Whiting School Welcomes Four New Department Chairs back on campus

Chemical Engineering: Professor Michael J. Betenbaugh is taking the helm as department chair. His predecessor as chair, Professor Michael E. Paulaitis, notes, “I have known Mike Betenbaugh since he was a graduate student in chemical engineering at the University of Delaware, having served as a faculty member on his PhD dissertation committee. He had a…

In Fluid Mechanics Research, CEAFM Continues the Legend back on campus

Although it may not be obvious to the casual observer, some of the most profound and intractable problems facing humankind today are rooted in fluid mechanics. Global climate change, ozone depletion, pollen transport, and asthma all involve the fluid commonly recognized as air. Without water, ours would be a lifeless planet, and in fact the…

Gala Celebrates New Campaign the wider world

More than 800 people gathered on May 4 for a gala dinner to celebrate the public announcement of The Johns Hopkins Campaign: Knowledge for the World and to pay tribute to Michael R. Bloomberg ’64. Now mayor of New York, the Whiting School alumnus on that day completed his term as chairman of the Johns…

Three Alumni Co-chair Whiting School’s Campaign the wider world

Innovation—Creating the Future, the Whiting School of Engineering’s campaign that was publicly announced on May 4, will build and expand on areas in which the School excels. With a goal of $150 million, the Whiting School campaign will seek support to endow professorships and academic departments, increase graduate fellowship and undergraduate scholarship endowments, acquire equipment,…

Infinite Possibilities Connections

A biomedical start-up across the street from the Homewood campus —IBT—is creating lifesaving products that draw upon faculty and alumni expertise. Like a good novel, the story behind Infinite Biomedical Technologies (IBT) begins with an intriguing partnership—between a self-professed “high school drop-out” and a scientist straining to hear the music of the human brain. To…

Northrop Grumman Partnership Leverages an Investment Connections

This year, Whiting School students and faculty will have an ideal opportunity to work closely with engineers at Northrop Grumman, Inc. through a new collaboration agreement. The partnership will promote graduate fellowships, faculty consulting, research initiatives, senior design projects, and internships. “The development of formal partnerships with blue-chip companies like Northrop Grumman facilitates a broad…

HEADSUP Attracts High School Students to Engineering Connections

While some Washington, DC-area high school students spend their summers serving up mocha javas and surfing cable TV reruns, a growing number are sampling the world of engineering as they program Java scripts and pull cable for network installations at the Pentagon. These future engineers are part of the Hopkins Engineering Advanced Summer University Program,…

D-FUSION: Incubating the Entrepreneurial Spirit Lab Notes

Where, in the wake of the dot-com collapse, are tomorrow’s high-tech start-ups to find their first footing? In the case of the new company D-Fusion, founded by Jacob Green ’99, ’00 MSE and John Schultz ’99, ’01 MSE, look no further than the Whiting School’s Department of Computer Science—and the lab of Dr. Yair Amir,…

Alonzo G. Decker, Jr. In Memoriam

Longtime Johns Hopkins University supporter Alonzo G. Decker, Jr. died of heart failure on March 18 at the age of 94. A Baltimore native and son of the co-founder of the Black & Decker Corporation, Al Decker was a cherished friend, a philanthropist, a businessman, an innovator, and an engineer. Many people, at Hopkins and…

An Eye for the Future High Performers

Michael I. Miller and colleagues at the Center for Imaging Science are investigating research with some far-sighted applications. On the third floor of the Whiting School’s Clark Hall, researchers are studying the theoretical underpinnings of how machines someday might understand what they see. Among these possibilities are identifying and tracking targets, analyzing medical images, sensing…

Progress All Around Us Editor's Note

Product rollouts, innovation, and process improvement: Those concepts are drivers in today’s engineering. At the Whiting School, we’ve been watching them in action—in the laboratories, the classrooms, and even out on the quad. Since “rolling out” the School’s new magazine last spring, in fact, we’ve been paying special attention to your suggestions so that we…

The Fun Place to Stay Fit Covers

There’s more fun in the life of Hopkins students— especially since the January opening of the three-story, 63,000-square-foot Ralph S. O’Connor Recreation Center. The $14.3 million facility was named in honor of the 1951 Johns Hopkins graduate, trustee emeritus, Houston businessman, philanthropist, and civic leader who has made generous gifts toward its construction. “The new…