TAGGED Johns Hopkins University

Securing the Power Grid

A cyber attack disabling America’s power grid would be catastrophic. New software developed at Johns Hopkins could help mitigate that risk.

Upstarts: A New Focus for Solar Cells

Next-generation materials for solar cells are cheap, flexible, and transparent, attributes that give them potential for creating films to coat windows or buildings. But defects that accumulate at large scales prevent them from being used for practical power generation.

Two Elected to National Academy of Engineering

Jennifer Elisseeff, professor of biomedical engineering, and Charles Meneveau, professor of mechanical engineering, were among 83 new members, along with 16 foreign members, elected into the 2018 class.

A Hackathon with Humanitarian Aims

At the first-ever virtual Humanitarian Design Hackathon at Johns Hopkins, student groups have been tasked with generating a solution to a problem or need faced mainly by Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

In Memoriam: Remembering Murray Sachs

Sachs’ research on how the brain receives and processes sound paved the way for the development of cochlear implants, electronic devices that deliver a sense of sound to people with hearing loss.

Sign of the Times

Johns Hopkins University has purchased Baltimore’s historic Stieff Silver complex, making a highly visible symbol of the city’s manufacturing heritage a part of its future in the knowledge economy.

So Long, Equations; Goodbye, Variables

Yannis Kevrekidis and his collaborators work on algorithms that exploit data to enhance, or even circumvent, conventional modeling of chemical and biological systems, and help scientists better predict system behavior—from reaction rates to materials properties.

Hot Commodities

KITT.AI has drawn global attention for its pioneering work in natural language processing—algorithms that recognize spoken language.

Asteroid Architecture

Knowing whether an asteroid is a giant hunk of rock or a floating gravel pile—or a mix of the two—will make a big difference in strategies that researchers might devise to prevent one from striking Earth or to drill inside.