TAGGED Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Of Paper and Permeability

For decades, preservationists have helped protect historic documents, such as centuries-old maps, by placing them in clear envelopes. Enclosing them in these clear envelopes provides mechanical support to help keep these old, brittle treasures from crumbling while also allowing the public to see and sometimes handle them. But paper degradation isn’t a self-contained event, says Patricia McGuiggan.

Upstarts: Fine-tuning Gas Sensing

Having sensitive, lightweight, and portable gas-sensing systems could be helpful for a variety of different users: people with asthma searching for their triggers, soldiers at risk of chemical attack, or industrial workers facing toxic gas exposures.

Change of Guard at INBT

Professors Sharon Gerecht and Hai-Quan Mao have assumed leadership of Johns Hopkins University’s Institute for NanoBioTechnology, succeeding Peter Searson and Denis Wirtz.

3-D Lattices That Are Very Cool

Sometimes, materials just don’t behave the way you need them to. So Timothy P. Weihs and his collaborators have gotten creative. By weaving metal threads into intricate patterns, he can make webby 3-D materials with unique properties.

Stressing Metallic Glass

When materials scientists want to create steel with specific properties—say, a certain combination of strength, hardness, and fracture resistance—they know how to approach the problem. Materials scientists know much less about how to predict and alter the mechanical properties of metallic glasses and other amorphous solids.

Upstarts

Johns Hopkins engineers are developing high-tech hardhats, collaborating for improved CT scanners, and working towards better tissue repair.

Trending

“It was painful to me, as an engineer, to see how badly we had failed society.”  2/16/16, Baltimore Sun Judy Mitrani-Reiser, civil engineering…

Upstarts

Disruptive ideas, findings, and products.