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WSE Homewood Graduate Student FAQ

Last updated: March 31, 2020 at 4:23 p.m.

 

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Health and Wellness/Basic Needs

  • When you do not feel well, it is hard to know how to get help.

    The Student Health & Wellness Center has a professional available to speak to you 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can receive a general health risk screening over the phone, as well as advice on where to go for any necessary follow-up, such as a local hospital or an urgent care center. If you have traveled to an area that puts you at particularly high risk for COVID-19, or you were exposed to someone with known or suspected coronavirus and have a fever or respiratory symptoms, please STAY HOME and CALL the SHWC at 410-516-8270.

    You may also read the CDC’s guidance on COVID-19 and what to do if you are sick.

    If you feel you cannot wait to call, dial 911 for immediate care.

    Important note about testing:
    • University Health Services and the Homewood Health Center are only ordering tests for those who meet the criteria set by the Johns Hopkins Infection Control – these criteria continue to be updated on a regular basis as the pandemic progresses. They will use the most current criteria for testing when they assess you over the phone.
    • If it is determined, based on the criteria, to administer a COVID-19 test, it could take up to 24 hours to arrange for the test during the weekday. If your test is being ordered on a weekend, you will be contacted on the next business day to arrange testing. Given the demand for tests, it is taking an average for 2-5 days to get back results.
  • If they are a JHU student/postdoctoral fellow, please encourage them to contact the Student Health & Wellness Center for guidance about what to do. They should make every effort to self-quarantine, in a private room, and reduce their interactions with anyone else in the home.

    If they are not a JHU student/postdoctoral fellow, they should contact their primary doctor/urgent care/emergency department as soon as possible (by phone) to request an appointment/guidance.

    The CDC has a helpful site for anyone who is concerned that they may have COVID-19.

    You should help take care of yourself and your remaining housemates. If possible, clean and sanitize all shared spaces (such as bathrooms and kitchens). If you have a separate space, like a bedroom, you can also self-quarantine. If you begin to feel sick in any way, call the SHWC. The CDC has guidance for anyone who is sharing a living space with someone either diagnosed or suspected of having COVID-19.

    Read the CDC’s guidance on self protection.

  • Even from afar, remember that we are here for you.

    The outbreak and response to COVID-19 may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions for all. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger.

    During this time, you have several options for support.

    • Reach out to a friend or family member for a video chat or phone call.
    • Call the Counseling Center (at 410-516-8278) and speak to a therapist over the phone.
    • Schedule a virtual case management session with Allison Leventhal, our student support and outreach case manager.
    • Try out SilverCloud, an online confidential mental health resource to which JHU now subscribes, that includes interactive learning modules that teach CBT (cognitive-behavioral therapy) techniques. Learn more about SilverCloud or sign up to get started.
    1. Being in a confined space can be stressful. Communication is very important if you’re feeling frustrated. Do your best to ask for what you need.
    2. Remember, you do not have to do everything together. Consider spending time in your own space, such as a bedroom, or taking turns using a communal space.
    3. If space is tight, or you need a break, consider a shared activity such as an online game, watching a TV show, a walk around the block, or even cleaning the apartment.
    • Identify a group of friends/other students who can do regular check-ins via Zoom/FaceTime/WhatsApp, etc.to see how everyone is doing and/or for accountability for one’s work. Seeing each other’s faces and having set times of the day can help with feelings of isolation and anxiety related to adjusting to these new circumstances.
    • Go outside. It is safe to go outside as long as you keep a safe distance from others. Whether you go for a walk, a run, a bike ride, or just sit somewhere, the fresh air can be therapeutic and help mitigate some of the claustrophobia that people experience after spending so much time at home and away from others.
    • If you are co-parenting with a partner, divide up parenting responsibilities throughout the day. Consider who has important meetings scheduled, or what hours you can be most productive.
    • If your dependent/child is able, work with them to come up with a list of activities they can choose from, such as coloring, taking a walk, calling a friend or family member, or watching a loved TV show. When you have an important task, ask them to pick from an activity and give a clear timeframe.
    • Identify a group of friends/other colleagues who want to do regular check ins with you and their children via Zoom/FaceTime/WhatsApp, etc.This can be a good check-in to see how everyone is doing and can help your child feel connected to others as well. In addition, seeing each other’s faces, being able to trade tips (and even, at times, commiserate in a healthy way) can help with feelings of isolation and anxiety about these new circumstances.
    • Be easy on yourself and realistic when defining what you want to accomplish every day. Set boundaries and establish reasonable deadlines and expectations with peers and your advisor/instructor. Communicate in advance (or as soon as possible) about any delays or other issues to help make accommodations.
  • Schedule a virtual case management session with Allison Leventhal, our student support and outreach case manager. Together you can discuss your financial concerns and potential solutions.

  • Yes, campus security is considered an essential part of the university operations.

 

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Connecting with Family and Friends

    • Right now is not the time for physical socialization, so you’ll need to find virtual/remote ways to stay in touch with your friends.
    • Identify a group of friends/other students who want to do regular check-ins via Zoom/FaceTime/WhatsApp, etc. This can be a social check-in to see how everyone is doing and/or it can be about accountability for one’s work. Seeing each other’s faces and having set times of the day to do this can help with feelings of isolation and anxiety about not getting your usual things done.
    • Attend any virtual events held by the GRO or other student groups.
  • As an adult,  you can technically go where you want (unless a federal/state mandate goes into effect that restricts travel, etc.), and you don’t need university permission for personal travel. That said, it is always important to take into consideration any travel restrictions and/or quarantines that may disrupt your schedule plans for arrivals and departures. You may be able to leave Baltimore, but may not be able to come back for a longer period than anticipated, for example. Additionally, this is not the time for physical socialization as we are in a state of aggressive social distancing.

    The current university stance is that “… all personal travel is strongly discouraged—international and domestic—and may be prohibited for certain employees (e.g., the health care workforce).  Faculty, staff, graduate students, and trainees should carefully consider whether or not any travel is advisable in light of the possibility for quarantine upon return and/or unforeseen travel restrictions in the United States or abroad. Also, please note that university divisions involved in the provision of health care may decide to prohibit non-essential domestic travel to protect the workforce.”
    If you do leave, it would generally be expected that you would continue to work on coursework, papers, data analysis, and project planning, and participate in group meetings, etc. (as appropriate to your degree program),  even from your remote location.   If you are a teaching assistant, you would need to fulfill those responsibilities remotely, both for the benefit of the class and to meet your obligations.
    Again, there is no guarantee that borders would stay open and stable, flights would continue, or that the public health situation might not change again, and if  you are unable to continue making progress on your degree and/or research you may need to adjust your enrollment status until the situation resolves. Please consider having a conversation with your advisor or Director of Graduate Study (and OIS if you are on a visa) to help you assess your options before making any travel arrangements.
    1. Being in a confined space can be stressful. Communication is very important if you’re feeling frustrated. Do your best to ask for what you need, with respect for others.
    2. Remember, you do not have to do everything together. Consider spending time in your own space, such as a bedroom, or taking turns using a communal space.
    3. If space is tight, or you need a break, consider a shared activity such as an online game, watching a TV show, a walk around the block, or even cleaning the apartment.

 

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Academic Policy Adjustments/Clarifications

Students have the right to appeal any issue that is not satisfactorily resolved between them and their advisor/program with their Chair/Head, DGS, and/or the Office of Graduate Academic Affairs.

  • In most cases the default grading system for their courses will remain intact, but WSE graduate students will be able to choose either to remain in the default grading method or may switch to P/F.

    Graduate Student P/F Choice

    • Graduate students will have until 5 p.m. on May 4, 2020 to make the decision to switch to P/F.  Students who wish to opt for a P/F will need to send an email to their course instructor expressing their decision by this date and time.
    • The decision to switch to P/F or remain in the default grading method cannot be reversed after May 4, 2020.
    • Students auditing a course cannot elect to change to P/F.
    • Students may make this request for courses taken at other university divisions as well as WSE EP courses (be prepared that the faculty may not know how to implement- refer them their registrar’s office or Asst Dean Christine Kavanagh).
    • Spring 2020 partial-semester courses (really, any  course) that have grades that have already posted are not eligible for a grading method change.

    Faculty Course Grading Method Petition (extenuating circumstances)

    If a faculty determines that the learning objectives of their course cannot be adequately achieved and/or assessed during remote instruction so as to provide a letter grade (A-F), then the faculty may petition to the Vice Dean of Graduate Education, Sri Sarma, for approval to change the grading method of their course to P/F.

      • The evaluation of these requests must include an assessment of student impact
      • Faculty requests must be submitted by April 10, 2020, and decisions will be finalized by April 13, 2020

     Important Notes for All:

    • A grade of P denotes an equivalent letter grade of C- or above.
    • Any courses taken in the Spring 2020 semester that were intended to count towards a student’s degree can still be counted if the grading method has been changed to P/F.  ‘F’ grades cannot count towards a degree requirement.
    • Graduate students can retake courses under the provisions of the Graduate Student Course Retake Policy.
    • Any undergraduate student taking a graduate course can only receive a grade of S/U. Please refer to the Spring 2020 COVID-19 undergraduate policy (S/U only).
      • This includes bachelor’s/master’s students who are taking graduate classes but  are still in undergraduate status.
        • Any course taken by a bachelor’s/master’s student in the Spring 2020 semester as S/U that is meant to count towards their WSE master’s degree will be able to count towards the graduate degree if (a) the conditions of double counting have been met or are not applicable per usual policy and (b) the course grade is a S. Undergraduate students should  consult with undergraduate academic advising for guidance as well as with their master’s program for confirmation.
    • There is no official WSE divisional graduate student GPA; however individual programs reserve the right to continue use of their internal GPA calculations to determine adequate academic progress. Note that a grade of ‘P” does not factor into any GPA calculations,  but a grade of ‘F’ under a P/F grading method carries the same weight as a letter grade ‘F’.
  • There are no changes to the audit policy. The deadline to switch to audit was March 6, 2020.

  • Yes, per the current policy in the academic catalog, students who are confronted with compelling circumstances beyond their control that interfere with the ability to complete their semester’s work during the normal course of a term may request an incomplete grade from the instructor.

    • Approval of such a request is neither automatic nor guaranteed, but in light of the unique and exceptional circumstances of the current COVID-19 pandemic, faculty are strongly encouraged to accommodate all incomplete requests to the best of their ability. 
    • The Office of Graduate Academic Affairs (Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh) can advise both students and faculty if needed.
    • Students typically have until the end of the third week of the next semester to finish incomplete work. Exceptions to this deadline typically require a petition from the faculty to the WSE Office of Graduate Academic Affairs (Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh) before the end of the third week of the following semester. When appealing to change the deadline, faculty members must specify a new date for completion of the work which must be before the end of the current semester. Further extensions may be granted as needed and appropriate in consultation with the Office of Graduate. Academic Affairs.
    • Faculty and students are required to confirm any terms for an incomplete course in writing (email is sufficient), including deadlines.
    • Incomplete grades cannot be held over into a third semester in order to complete any outstanding work, nor can incomplete grades be resolved by retaking the course.
    • Students with incomplete grades in required courses at the date of degree conferral will not graduate. Students with incomplete grades in courses that are not required for degree completion may still graduate. However, the deadline for completion is abbreviated; students must resolve incomplete grades within 30 days after the date of degree conferral which is when the university closes their graduate record.
    • Dropping or withdrawing from a course with an Incomplete grade is not permissible at any time.
    • Changing an Incomplete grade to a final grade (A through F, Pass) may be done by the instructor during the designated timeframe. After that deadline passes, grade change requests must be sent via a grade change form to Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh for review and approval.
  • Yes. Due to the exceptional circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, WSE graduate students may Drop (no note on transcript) a class up to 5 p.m. EDT on Friday, April 17, 2020. Approval from the course instructor, the student’s advisor/program, and lastly, Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh, must be secured before the drop can be processed. Students cannot process a drop request through SIS self-service; it must be done via a course change form and email.

     

    Course Drop Financial and Enrollment Status Considerations

  • Yes. After April 17, 2020, students may Withdraw (noted with a ‘W’ on transcript) from a class up to 5 p.m. EDT on Monday, May 4, 2020. Approval from the course instructor, the student’s adviser/program, and lastly, Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh, must be secured before the withdrawal can be processed. Students cannot process a withdraw request through SIS self-service; it must be done via a course change form and email.

    Course Withdrawal Financial and Enrollment Status Considerations

  • Leniency and funding should be provided to any WSE PhD student who needs to extend to an additional term or semester (or needs to postpone an essential milestone by a term or semester) due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

     

    Leniency means:

    • PhD students should not be placed on probation because (1) they cannot finish essential lab work this semester due to research restrictions, or (2) need to postpone a qualifying exam, graduate board oral exam or defense to the next term/semester, or (3) due to personal illness or the care of another who is ill, or any other personal hardship related to COVID-19 is temporarily unable to complete requirements or meet expectations as usual. Note that if a student neglects their obligations egregiously with no reason; or fails an oral or qualifying exam/program requirement without any extenuating. circumstances at play and there is a program policy in place citing an automatic probation, a probation may be considered (after consultation with the Office of Graduate Academic Affairs).
    • Students have the right to request a Leave of Absence if their inability to be productive continues at a consistent rate or if they need to take extended personal or health-related time away from their graduate program.

     

    Funding Considerations: 

    • If a PhD student needs to continue in the program and will remain in a full-time, resident status, then the program/advisor is responsible for continuing the student’s full funding, per WSE’s Financial and Administrative Policies (page 38, section 8.1). 
    • If a PhD student needs to extend to an additional FINAL semester due to the COVID-19 pandemic and is eligible and approved to switch to a nonresident status, the Dean’s office will waive the nonresident tuition for up to one semester. The advisor/program would be responsible for payment towards the health premium for up to one semester. In that one semester, unless, or until the student has employment outside the program, the program/advisor should maintain a minimum stipend.
    • Please contact Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh with any questions.
  • Leniency should be given to any WSE master’s student who needs to extend to an additional term or semester (or needs to postpone an essential milestone by a term or semester) and/or is performing below expectations, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

     

    Coursework-Only Master’s Students

    As classes are still being offered for the duration of the Spring 2020 semester, coursework-only students should be able to complete their degree requirements as anticipated with no universally applied special accommodation. However, if a student needs to drop/withdraw/take a leave of absence due to extenuating circumstances, it would be handled sensitively (and situationally) per the standard protocol as in any other semester. No special tuition policy is in place for this population, but any student who needed it would receive flexibility in accommodation and case management support.

     

    Leniency for coursework-only master’s students means that:

    • Master’s students should not be placed on probation because of poor performance in the Spring 2020 semester linked to a hardship or extenuating circumstance related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Note that if a student neglects their obligations egregiously with no reason; or there are no extenuating circumstances at play and there is a program policy in place citing an automatic probation, a probation may be considered (after consultation with the Office of Graduate Academic Affairs).
    • Students have the right to request a Leave of Absence if their inability to be successful continues at a consistent rate or if they need to take extended personal or health-related time away from their graduate program.
    • Please contact Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh with any questions
  • Leniency should be given to any WSE master’s student who needs to extend to an additional term or semester (or needs to postpone an essential milestone by a term or semester) and/or is performing below expectations, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

     

    Research Master’s Students (students using research/thesis/essay/project etc. to complete their degree)

    If there are any options for a research master’s student to complete their degree on time or with only a slight delay (through summer, for example) despite losing access to the lab, it should be pursued. Advisors and programs are encouraged to explore alternative assessments of the learning objectives tied to the students’ research or remote projects that could satisfy the research requirement. Research master’s students also have the option to complete their degree as coursework-only master’s if they have the required courses.

     

    Leniency for research master’s students means that:

    • Research Master’s students should not be placed on probation because (1) they cannot finish essential lab work this semester due to research restrictions, or (2) need to postpone a master’s thesis defense to the next term/semester, or (3) due to personal illness or the care of another who is ill, or any other personal hardship related to COVID-19 are temporarily unable to complete requirements or meet expectations as normally expected. Note that if a student neglects their obligations egregiously with no reason; or fails an oral or qualifying exam/program requirement without any extenuating circumstances at play and there is a program policy in place citing an automatic probation, a probation may be considered (after consultation with the Office of Graduate Academic Affairs).
    • Students have the right to request a Leave of Absence if their inability to be productive continues at a consistent rate or if they need to take extended personal or health-related time away from their graduate program.
    • Please contact Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh with any questions.

     

    Funding Considerations:

    • There is no summer tuition for research courses, so if a research master’s regains access to the lab during the SU20 term, it is feasible that they could wrap up their degree in the Summer with no additional tuition.
    • Additionally, research master’s students may be able to finish as a pre-semester completer for Fall 2020 (no tuition or registration required) or a Grace Period completer in the Fall 2020 semester (registration required, tuition fee deferred and waived if deadline is met).
    • If a research master’s student who was originally set to graduate in the SP20 semester or SU20 term needs to extend to an additional semester to complete research and any required writing (capstone, thesis, essay, project, etc.) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and only have to register in research for the final semester, they should apply for nonresident status. Research master’s in this situation will receive a 50% tuition waiver for the one final semester from the Dean’s office. Depts/programs are encouraged to provide the other 50% and health insurance premium for that one semester of non-residency.
    • Please contact Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh with any questions.

     

  • As a starting point, here are three options for research master’s students to consider regarding how to complete their degree. Programs are encouraged to advise their students directly and make internal decisions that best reflect the culture and curriculum of the program. Students and programs are NOT limited to this list.

    1. The program can assess current research completed and make an internal decision about what and how it could be used – possibly in combination with an alternative requirement- to satisfy the degree without the student needing to wait for lab access.
    2. If the student only needs a month or so to finish their labwork, they could decide with their program to simply wait until they regain lab access
    3. The student can decide to pursue a coursework-only master’s instead and work towards those requirements (if not already met).

     

 

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Academic Concerns

  • Every effort is being made to help students maintain the status they had when social distancing was implemented. It is not anticipated that funding and enrollment status, etc. will be affected if your productivity this semester is not what you want/need it to be as a result of COVID-19-related circumstances. You do need to remain as engaged as possible, though.

    OIS has reassured us that as long as international students stay in the U.S. and maintain their approved and current enrollment status, their visas should not be adversely affected by any delays/redesign of your academic/research modality.

    Faculty are being encouraged to be creative and develop viable alternative options to help students complete their degree requirements if they are no longer able to do research in the lab. Programs and departments are working hard to help students graduate, despite these new limitations to campus/lab access; and we will all work together to help students get through this with as little inconvenience as possible.

    If there is a possibility that you may not finish your degree in the term in which you originally expected to, please talk with your advisor/DGS (director of graduate study) in your program, or make an appointment with the Office of Graduate Academic Affairs (Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh).

  • Coursework Probations

    Unless there are extraordinary circumstances affecting performance, generally, students on academic performance (coursework) probation this semester will be held to the original terms laid out in their probation notification letter (such as needing to achieve certain letter grades (A-F for example) in their spring classes, etc.). Programs may need to revise the length of probations based on the Spring 2020 P/F options being offered to students; and should be prepared for more students meeting the criteria for extraordinary circumstances for an extension than in other semesters. Context and understanding is essential: probations are generally meant to help guide students to better  their performance and not create unreasonable barriers to success.

    • Extraordinary circumstances for probation extension may include personal illness or care of another who is ill; technological issues that preempt a student’s ability to perform well in the remote classroom setting; or other compelling personal hardship issues that stem from the COVID-19 pandemic and may preclude a student from performing at their best. Students who are under a coursework probation and are experiencing extenuating circumstances should reach out to their program as well as to the WSE’s Case Manager for Student Support and Outreach as soon as possible. Programs and faculty are encouraged to share concerns about their students’ wellbeing with the WSE’s Case Manager for Student Support and Outreach.
    • Under the current probation policy, departments always have the ability to extend probationary periods/reevaluate terms as appropriate and desired, and students may ask their director of graduate study for more information and clarity, if needed.
    • Programs should consult with Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh on their current probations.
  • Please visit https://jhubluejays.zoom.us this site to learn about setting up Zoom, or see if your advisor already has a Zoom account link ready for use. For the public portion of your defense, you can certainly invite your family and friends to join the Zoom (by sending the meeting link) to watch your presentation (make sure they mute themselves though so you aren’t distracted!). After you finish your presentation and answer all questions from your committee, you and your family/friends should exit the Zoom fully before your committee begins deliberations. Then, your advisor can email/text you to reenter the Zoom to hear the outcome of the committee’s deliberations.

    If the committee asks you to show your work on any questions they pose- you could try either writing on paper and holding up to the webcam (clunky, but may work), or scanning on your phone and emailing. We realize this may not be the most seamless way to hold a defense, but everyone will be understanding in this exceptional time.

  • Please visit https://jhubluejays.zoom.us to learn about setting up a Zoom account for yourself, or see if your advisor already has a Zoom account link ready for use. After you finish answering all questions from your committee, you should exit the Zoom fully before your committee begins deliberations. Then, your advisor can email/text you to reenter the Zoom to hear the outcome of the committee’s deliberations.

    If the committee asks you to show your work on any questions they pose- you could try either writing on paper and holding up to the webcam (clunky, but may work), or scanning on your phone and emailing. We realize this may not be the most seamless way to experience an oral exam, but everyone is understanding in this exceptional time.

  • Research Probations

    Unless the majority of conditions (also referred to as ‘terms’) in a student’s research probation can be reasonably met through remote work, programs will need to revise the probation terms for any students currently under a research probation; and are expected to extend probationary periods accordingly. In addition, programs should take into account any extraordinary circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic that may prevent a student on probation from meeting the terms by previously established deadlines, and should be prepared for more students meeting the criteria for extraordinary circumstances than in other semesters. Context and understanding is essential: probations are generally meant to help guide students to better their performance and not create unreasonable barriers to success.

    • Extraordinary circumstances may include personal illness or care of another who is ill; no work that can be done remotely, or a considerable loss of progress due to lab restrictions; or any other compelling personal hardship issues that stem from the COVID-19 pandemic and may preclude a student from performing at their personal best. Students who are under a research probation and are experiencing extenuating circumstances should reach out to their program as well as to the WSE’s Case Manager for Student Support and Outreach as soon as possible. Programs and faculty are encouraged to share concerns about their students’ wellbeing with the WSE’s Case Manager for Student Support and Outreach.
    • Under the current probation policy, departments always have the ability to extend probationary periods/reevaluate terms as appropriate and desired, and students may ask their director of graduate study for more information and clarity, if needed.
    • Programs should consult with Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh on their current probations.
  • No, you do not need to change your enrollment status because classes are being delivered remotely.

  • Continue to be patient (and thank you!) and be assured that it will be processed soon. The Office of Graduate Academic Affairs is able to approve retroactive actions, when needed. If you don’t see your request completed by the first week of April, feel free to reach out to the Office of Graduate Academic Affairs (Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh).

  • Continue to be patient (and thank you!) and be assured that it will be processed soon. The Office of Graduate Academic Affairs is able to approve retroactive actions, when needed, and the registrar’s office strives to be quick in their service to students. If you don’t see your request completed by the first week in April, feel free to reach out to the Office of Graduate Academic Affairs (Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh).

 

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Research Concerns

  • Unfortunately, you won’t be able to work in the lab, so now is the time to discuss with your advisor any remote options and projects that you can do in the interim period.

    Minimal access to laboratories will be maintained so that critical activities, such as maintaining animals, unique reagents, and essential equipment and materials, can continue. Consult with your faculty mentor/advisor or program director about your role in these activities, if any.

    Even though there is no doubt that the research you do is important, most research is not considered essential. Advisors are being encouraged to develop ways to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows continue their work remotely and to help troubleshoot and plan for how to maintain research/degree progress continuity through this temporary disruption to lab access.

    We understand that this may be severely disruptive to your scholarly activities and we will work to support your efforts. We encourage you to take this time to focus on the activities that can be completed remotely, such as writing papers and grant proposals, and completing data analysis. We will ensure remote access wherever possible, and we suggest backing up your data to OneDrive. Please consult with your advisor for individual guidance.

  • Faculty are being encouraged to think outside the box and find creative alternative viable options they can develop to help students finish their degree requirements, if they are no longer able to do research in the lab. Programs and departments are working hard to help students graduate despite these new limitations to campus/lab access; and we will all work together to help students get through.

    If there is a possibility that you may not finish your degree in the term in which you originally expected, please talk with your advisor/DGS (director of graduate study in your program) or make a virtual appointment with the Office of Graduate Academic Affairs (Assistant Dean Christine Kavanagh).

  • If the reason for your diminished productivity is lack of lab of access or is another result of the JHU COVID-19 response, then you should not face probation.

    The salary or stipend support and benefits that are currently offered to PhD students will not be interrupted as they work remotely, and there is an understanding that PhD students will continue doing their best to remain fully engaged even if they are not able to be as productive.

    It may be reassuring to know that faculty are being strongly encouraged to think outside the box and see how many creative alternative viable options they can develop to help students finish their degree requirements if they are no longer able to do research in the lab. Programs and departments are working hard to help students graduate, despite these new limitations to campus/lab access; and we will all work together to help students get through. You should consider talking about your concerns with either your advisor/program academic staff/Office of Graduate Academic Affairs.

  • Minimal access to laboratories will be maintained so that critical activities, such as maintaining animals, unique reagents, and essential equipment and materials, can continue. Consult with your faculty mentor/advisor or program director about your role in these activities, if any.

  • Yes, all mandatory safety services/practices will continue.

  • The first step is to have a discussion with your immediate supervisor (advisor/PI, etc.), and if needed, you can then reach out to Sri Sarma, vice dean for graduate education.

  • Absolutely! You should schedule regular Zoom meetings/phone calls with your advisor. If anything, meet more frequently than you used to. Talk about realistic goals for the coming week and about how you’ll both navigate the new advising modality as well as any concerns/issues either of you have.

 

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Remote Delivery of Classes

  • Zoom is a video/audio conferencing tool that works with your computer, phone, and/or conference room system (Polycom). It can work as an online conference room, phone bridge, or webinar host. It works with Windows, Mac, mobile (Android / iOS), regular phone lines, and in-room cameras (H.323). It’s flexible, reliable, and easy to use-similar to things you might have used before like GoToMeeting, WebEx, or Skype.

    To activate a personal Zoom account, WSE students should go to https://jhubluejays.zoom.us.

  • If you are experiencing technical issues, you should reach out to the WSE instructional support team at the email address wse-is@jhu.edu.

    You can also visit the JHU Zoom site for general implementation guidance, troubleshooting, and FAQs (as well as training materials).

    1. Visit the Center for Educational Resources website for a great guide on how to prepare for your courses remotely.
    2. Before the first online class on March 23, make sure your computer and internet access are stable.
    3. Try Zoom out before you have your first class online.
    4. Create a dedicated space in your home for you to log into your online classes. When setting up your dedicated space for your online classes, make sure you:
      • Have headphones for listening to lectures or discussions (especially important in shared spaces)
      • Inform your roommates/housemates/partner when your classes will be held and ask them to respect your need for focus during those times.
    1. Visit the Center for Educational Resources website for a great guide on how to prepare for your courses remotely.
    2. Eliminate distractions so you can focus on the class as you would if you were there in-person: Consider putting your phone in your bag or dresser, etc. (away from your line of sight) to avoid losing focus every time a text message or notification pops up.
    3.  Treat an online course like a “real” course: You must “show up” if you’re going to get real value out of your class. Treat your online classes the same way you treated them when they were offered in-person.
    4.  Participate Fully: Continue to participate in the course as much as you would if the course were meeting in-person. This might involve commenting on a classmate’s paper on a discussion board or posting a question about a project you’re working on. Read what other students and your professor are saying, and if you have a question, ask for clarification.
    5. Speak Up: If you are having issues with the new way your course is being delivered, and/or it is adversely impacting your performance in the class, speak up. Don’t wait until an assignment is almost due to ask questions or report issues. Email your professor and be proactive in asking for help.
  • Schedule a virtual appointment with Allison Leventhal, our student support and outreach case manager, to discuss your situation and possible options for resolution.

 

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Professional Development/Visa Concerns

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