In This Issue

At WSE View All

Sign of the Times

Johns Hopkins University has purchased Baltimore’s historic Stieff Silver complex, making a highly visible symbol of the city’s manufacturing heritage a part of its future in the knowledge economy.

Two Elected to National Academy of Engineering

Jennifer Elisseeff, professor of biomedical engineering, and Charles Meneveau, professor of mechanical engineering, were among 83 new members, along with 16 foreign members, elected into the 2018 class.

Impact View All

C-Arms Bring 3-D to the OR

Jeff Siewerdsen and his team are advancing imaging technologies that will make surgery more precise and improve patient safety.

Tech Tools: Getting Under Your Skin

Stand in front of this “magic mirror,” and it seems to peer beneath your skin, revealing bones, major organs, blood vessels, and muscles.

Upstarts: Fine-tuning Gas Sensing

Having sensitive, lightweight, and portable gas-sensing systems could be helpful for a variety of different users: people with asthma searching for their triggers, soldiers at risk of chemical attack, or industrial workers facing toxic gas exposures.

Students View All

Priming the Pump

Residents of the tiny Guatemalan village of Chicorral used to struggle up and down a steep ravine to fetch water from a stream for cooking, bathing, and drinking. Thanks to a solar-powered pump installed a few years ago by Johns Hopkins engineers, water now comes directly into their homes via a pipe.

Wind Power’s Smooth Operators

Fleets of small fossil-fuel power plants typically smooth those fluctuations. But could wind farms themselves provide that service?

Go Figure

In a class fondly known as Senior Lab, chemical and biomolecular engineering students begin to transform from passive receivers of knowledge into engineers who troubleshoot equipment quirks and adjust experiments on the fly.

Alumni View All

Old Yet Hip

Furniture company Hugo & Hoby is finding success with its old-yet-hip guidelines—locally sourced, sustainable materials, local fabricators, durable and beautiful design, and close personal relationships with both clients and makers.

Toward More Adaptable Cellphones

Cellphones that seamlessly work on any network would make lives easier for international travelers. Alyssa Apsel, PhD ’03, is designing inexpensive, flexible radio systems to help make that possible.

Back Talk View All

Start Preparing for the Next Hurricane Irma

It’s time to stop using the words “unprecedented” or “one in a pick-your-large-number-year flood” to fool ourselves into believing that we’re experiencing one-off weather that can’t be defended against.

From The Dean

From the Dean

The pace of change here is almost dizzying. In the last year alone, the Whiting School’s footprint on Homewood campus—and slightly beyond—has increased by 20 percent, allowing us to expand our critical core research facilities and world-class laboratories, and add more space for centers and institutes.