Thesis Proposal: Pramuditha Perera

When:
January 30, 2020 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
2020-01-30T15:00:00-05:00
2020-01-30T16:00:00-05:00
Where:
Hackerman Hall B-17
Thesis Proposal: Pramuditha Perera @ Hackerman Hall B-17

Title: Deep Learning-based Novelty Detection

Abstract: In recent years, intelligent systems powered by artificial intelligence and computer vision that perform visual recognition have gained much attention. These systems observe instances and labels of known object classes during training and learn association patterns that can be
used during inference. A practical visual recognition system should first determine whether an observed instance is from a known class. If it is from a known class, then the identity of the instance is queried through classification. The former process is commonly known as novelty detection (or novel class detection) in the literature. Given a set of image instances from known classes, the goal of novelty detection is to determine whether an observed image during inference belongs to one of the known classes.

We consider one-class novelty detection, where all training data are assumed to belong to a single class without any finer-annotations available. We identify limitations of conventional approaches in one-class novelty detection and present a Generative Adversarial Network(GAN) based solution. Our solution is based on learning latent representations of in-class examples using a denoising auto-encoder network. The key contribution of our work is our proposal to explicitly constrain the latent space to exclusively represent the given class. In order to accomplish this goal, firstly, we force the latent space to have bounded support by introducing a tanh activation in the encoder’s output layer. Secondly, using a discriminator in the latent space that is trained adversarially, we ensure that encoded representations of in-class examples resemble uniform random samples drawn from the same bounded space. Thirdly, using a second adversarial discriminator in the input space, we ensure all randomly drawn latent samples generate examples that look real.

Finally, we introduce a gradient-descent based sampling technique that explores points in the latent space that generate potential out-of-class examples, which are fed back to the network to further train it to generate in-class examples from those points. The effectiveness of the proposed method is measured across four publicly available datasets using two one-class novelty detection protocols where we achieve state-of-the-art results.

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