Graduate Course Schedule

Want to see what areas of study we offer and what makes the graduate experience at JHU unique? Click here.

Graduate Course Schedule

The Department of Civil Engineering course schedules are available here:

SPRING 2018 

FALL 2018

  • Basic solid mechanics for structural engineers. Stress, strain and constitutive laws. Linear elasticity and viscoelasticity. Introduction to nonlinear mechanics. Static, dynamic and thermal stresses. Specialization of theory to one- and two-dimensional cases: plane stress and plane strain, rods, and beams. Work and energy principles; variational formulations.
  • Covers probabilistic computational modeling in civil engineering and mechanics: Monte Carlo simulation, sampling methods and variance reduction techniques, simulation of stochastic processes and fields, and expansion methods. Applications to stochastic finite element, uncertainty quantification, reliability analysis, and model verification and validation.
  • Matrix methods for the analysis of statistically indeterminate structures such as beams, plane and space trusses, and plane and space frames. Stiffness and flexibility methods. Linear elastic analysis and introduction to nonlinear analysis.
  • This course will explore bridge design and analysis by studying local bridges of various forms, materials, and load demands. Topics include an overview of the history of bridge engineering, an introduction to the AASHTO Standard Specifications for Highway Bridges, analysis techniques and load ratings, bridge details, and substructure design.
  • The renovation of existing buildings often holds many advantages over new construction, including greater economy, improved sustainability, and the maintenance of engineering heritage and architectural character in our built environment. Yet, the renovation of existing structures presents many challenges to structural engineers. These challenges include structural materials that are no longer in widespread use (e.g., unreinforced masonry arches and vaults, cast iron, and wrought iron) as well as structural materials for which analysis and design practices have changed significantly over the last half-century (e.g., wood, steel, and reinforced concrete). This course will examine structures made of a wide variety of materials and instruct the student how to evaluate their condition, determine their existing capacity, and design repairs and/or reinforcement. The investigation and analysis procedures learned from this course may then be applied to create economical and durable structural alterations that allow for the reuse of older buildings. Site visits near Homewood campus will supplement lectures.
  • Variational methods and mathematical foundations, Direct and Iterative solvers, 1-D Problems formulation and boundary conditions, Trusses, 2-D/ 3D Problems, Triangular elements, QUAD4 elements, Higher Order Elements, Element Pathology, Improving Element Convergence, Dynamic Problems. 
  • Graduate students are expected to register for this course each semester. Both internal and outside speakers are included. 

SPRING 2019 (tentative)

  • This course presents a broad survey of the basic mathematical methods used in the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations: linear algebra, power series, Fourier series, separation of variables, integral transforms. Course is NOT open to master’s students in Financial Mathematics or Applied Mathematics and Statistics. 
  • Functional and computational examination of elastic and inelastic single degree of freedom systems with classical and non-classical damping subject to various input excitations including earthquakes with emphasis on the study of system response. Extension to multi-degree of freedom systems with emphasis on modal analysis and numerical methods. Use of the principles of structural dynamics in earthquake response.
  • The renovation of existing buildings often holds many advantages over new construction, including greater economy, improved sustainability, and the maintenance of engineering heritage and architectural character in our built environment. Yet, the renovation of existing structures presents many challenges to structural engineers. These challenges include structural materials that are no longer in widespread use (e.g., unreinforced masonry arches and vaults, cast iron, and wrought iron) as well as structural materials for which analysis and design practices have changed significantly over the last half-century (e.g., wood, steel, and reinforced concrete). This course will examine structures made of a wide variety of materials and instruct the student how to evaluate their condition, determine their existing capacity, and design repairs and/or reinforcement. The investigation and analysis procedures learned from this course may then be applied to create economical and durable structural alterations that allow for the reuse of older buildings. Site visits near Homewood campus will supplement lectures.
  • This course will discuss the analysis and design of structures exposed to fire. It will cover the fundamentals of fire behavior, heat transfer, the effects of fire loading on materials and structural systems, and the principles and design methods for fire resistance design. Particular emphasis will be placed on the advanced modeling and computational tools for performance-based design. Applications of innovative methods for fire resistance design in large structural engineering projects, such as stadiums and tall buildings, will also be presented.
  • Students will learn to develop agent-based and systems dynamics models to simulate complex systems. Models with hierarchical and other structures will be examined, and applications will be chosen based on student interest.
  • This course will: • Introduce the student to disaster risk modeling process, including: – Structure of catastrophe models. Uses in loss estimation and mitigation. – Study and modeling of hazards (esp. hurricanes and earthquakes; also flood, landslide, and volcanic) – Vulnerability assessment: simulation of building damage, and estimation of post-disaster injuries and casualties. – Exposure modeling (building typology distribution). • Introduction to disaster economic loss modeling: – Interpretation of risk metrics (return periods, PML, AAL, VaR, TVaR), their uncertainty, and applicability to management and financial decision making process. – Elements of present and future risk: climate and exposure changes. – Student will gain introductory experience in the use of GIS and simulation with Matlab.
  • Graduate students are expected to register for this course each semester. Both internal and outside speakers are included.
  • Variational methods and mathematical foundations, Direct and Iterative solvers, 1-D Problems formulation and boundary conditions, Trusses, 2-D/ 3D Problems, Triangular elements, QUAD4 elements, Higher Order Elements, Element Pathology, Improving Element Convergence, Dynamic Problems.
  • Description coming soon.
  • Description coming soon.
Engineering for Professionals Classes

Full-time graduate students in the Department of Civil Engineering may also take courses in Johns Hopkins’ Engineering for Professionals (EP) program.  For questions related to these courses or for help with registration, visit ep.jhu.edu or contact Dr. Rachel Sangree (sangree@jhu.edu).

FALL 2018 (tentative)

565.620          Advanced Steel Design

565.664          Advanced Foundation Design

SPRING 2019 (tentative)

565.616          Applied Finite Element Methods

565.622          Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design

565.630          Prestressed Concrete Design

565.684          Port and Harbor Engineering

565.734           Wind Engineering


Graduate Job Opportunities

To view job opportunities directed towards graduates, please visit our Job Opportunities webpage.

 

Back to top