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Tag: Department of Computer Science

Nassir Navab of CS wins “10-Year Lasting Impact Award” at ISMAR

October 2, 2015

Nassir Navab, a professor in the Department of Computer Science, has won the “10 Years Lasting Impact Award” at the International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality. He was honored for overall contributions to augmented reality, with a particular focus on medical augmented reality. ISMAR is a leading international academic conference in the field of Augmented Reality […]

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JHU cosmologist and computer scientist Alex Szalay receives IEEE Computer Society honor

October 2, 2015

Johns Hopkins University cosmologist and computer scientist Alexander Szalay has received the 2015 IEEE Computer Society Sidney Fernbach Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions in the application of high-performance computers using innovative approaches. Szalay was recognized “for his outstanding contributions to the development of data-intensive computing systems and on the application of such systems in many scientific […]

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Medical robotics pioneer Russell H. Taylor to receive 2015 Honda Prize

September 29, 2015

Russell H. Taylor, a Whiting School of Engineering professor who is widely hailed as the father of medical robotics, has been selected to receive the 2015 Honda Prize. The selection was announced Sept. 28 by the Honda Foundation, which initiated this honor in 1980 as Japan’s first international science and technology award. The Honda Foundation, based […]

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Computer algorithm could aid in early detection of life-threatening sepsis

August 7, 2015

For a patient with sepsis—which kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast and prostate cancer combined—hours can make the difference between life and death. The quest for early diagnosis of this life-threatening condition now takes a step forward, as Johns Hopkins University researchers report on a more effective way to spot hospital patients […]

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Hager named inaugural Mandell Bellmore Professor

June 23, 2015

Gregory D. Hager, professor and past chair of the Department of Computer Science, has been named the Whiting School’s inaugural Mandell Bellmore Professor. The endowed professorship was created by John Malone, PhD ’69, and is named in honor of Malone’s thesis advisor in the Department of Operations Research. Hager is a leader in the development […]

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Johns Hopkins Applied Math students a hit with Minor League Baseball schedulers

June 16, 2015

With the help of some Johns Hopkins University applied math students, Minor League Baseball is catching up with the majors in using computers to produce its game schedules. Doing away with the tedious and more time-consuming method of developing schedules by hand, the students and their professors used complicated mathematical formulas to coax computers into […]

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Taylor receives IEEE EMBS’s Technical Achievement Award

May 8, 2015

Russell H. Taylor, the John C. Malone Professor of Computer Science and director of the Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics at the Whiting School of Engineering, has won the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Engineering in Medicine and Biology Technical Achievement Award for “contributions and leadership in the field of surgical robotics and […]

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ClearGuide Medical receives $1.5 million NIH award

April 16, 2015

The National Institutes of Health have awarded ClearGuide Medical, a tech startup co-founded by Department of Computer Science Chair Gregory D. Hager, a two-year, $1.5 million SBIR Phase II award. ClearGuide offers groundbreaking software that enables doctors and technicians to perform far more accurate ultrasound-guided procedures, such as needle biopsies. The NIH-funded project provides a new feedback […]

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Researchers look to Twitter to better understand vaccine refusal

February 24, 2015

A Johns Hopkins computer scientist is part of a team of researchers that has developed a new way to understand vaccine refusal by studying an unlikely resource: Twitter. The researchers will combine Twitter analyses with traditional survey techniques to study why people refuse vaccines and how these reasons vary among communities. The focus on vaccination […]

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