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Sep
18
Wed
Cryptography Roundtable Discussion
Sep 18 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Recent news reports stated that the National Security Agency has pursued new methods that have allowed the agency to monitor telephone and online communication, encrypted information that was thought to be virtually immune to eavesdropping. What steps can and should computer scientists take in response to this privacy threat? How will the recent revelations affect the future of cryptography—the field of encoding and decoding electronic communication and transmissions for the purposes of privacy, reliability and efficiency?

To address these questions, the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute will host an hour-long roundtable discussion, moderated by Anton Dahbura, interim executive director of the Information Security Institute, and Avi Rubin, the institute’s technical director. Other participants will include Johns Hopkins cyber-security experts Matthew Green, Stephen Checkoway and Giuseppe Ateniese.

The event will be streamed live at https://connect.johnshopkins.edu/jhuisicrypto/, and also will be posted online following the event.

 

NOTE: Seating at this public event will be limited. Members of the media who plan to cover the discussion are asked to RSVP to Phil Sneiderman, prs@jhu.edu.

Nov
1
Tue
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents “Change Point Estimation of Brain Shape Data in Relation with Alzheimer’s Disease”
Nov 1 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents "Change Point Estimation of Brain Shape Data in Relation with Alzheimer's Disease" @ Clark Hall 110, VTC to Traylor 709

Laurent Younes, professor and chair of the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Johns Hopkins University, will present “Change Point Estimation of Brain Shape Data in Relation with Alzheimer’s Disease.”

Abstract: The manifestation of an event, such as the onset of a disease, is not always immediate and often requires some time for its repercussions to become observable. Slowly progressing diseases, and in particular neuro-degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), fall into this category. The manifestation of such diseases is related to the onset of cognitive or functional impairment and, at the time when this occurs, the disease may have already had been affecting the brain anatomically and functionally for a considerable time. We consider a statistical two-phase regression model in which the change point of a disease biomarker is measured relative to another point in time, such as the manifestation of the disease, which is subject to right-censoring (i.e., possibly unobserved over the entire course of the study). We develop point estimation methods for this model, based on maximum likelihood, and bootstrap validation methods. The effectiveness of our approach is illustrated by numerical simulations, and by the estimation of a change point for atrophy in the context of Alzheimer’s disease, wherein it is related to the cognitive manifestation of the disease. This work is a collaboration with Marilyn Albert, Xiaoying Tang and Michael Miller, and was partially supported by the NIH.

For those who cannot make it to the Homewood campus, the seminar will be video-conferenced to Traylor 709 on the School of Medicine campus.

For those who attend at Homewood, lunch will be provided at noon.

Feb
6
Mon
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents “The Role of Quantitative Pharmacology in Drug Development”
Feb 6 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

“The Role of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development”

Don Stanski joined AstraZeneca in early 2014 as Global Head of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology. He received his MD from the University of Calgary and his clinical anesthesiology residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, followed by research training in clinical pharmacology/ pharmacometrics from the late Lewis B. Sheiner at the University of California, San Francisco. He joined Stanford University in 1979 developing a clinical pharmacology and pharmacometric academic research program for anesthetic/analgesic drugs. In 1992 he became Chairman of the Department of Anesthesia. He retired emeritus from Stanford in 2005. He spent two years as a senior scientific advisor at the FDA then joined Novartis. He built an integrated Modeling and Simulation program at Novartis over the next eight years, prior to joining AstraZeneca. Don works out of AstraZeneca’s Gaithersburg, MD site.

 

 

 

Dave Boulton joined AstraZeneca in early 2015. He is the Late-Phase Metabolics Franchise Lead for Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology where he is accountable for anti-diabetic and anti-hyperkalemic medicines. He received his BPharm and PhD from the University of Otago, New Zealand, with an internship between his degrees qualifying him as a licensed Pharmacist. This was followed by 4 years of postdoctoral training at the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. Dave then joined Bristol-Myers Squibb where for 14 years he worked as an individual contributor and later in leadership roles as a Clinical Pharmacologist in a number of therapeutic areas and in all phases of drug development. Dave works out of AstraZeneca’s Gaithersburg, MD site.

Click here to view webcast.

 

“The Role of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development”

Dr. Stanski will discuss the integration and quantitative modelling of data and disease information over the research and development spectrum to generate knowledge that informs clinical drug development and underpins business decisions which is the core mission of the Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology (QCP) Department at AstraZeneca (AZ). This framework ensures the right patient gets the right dose at the right time with optimized trial designs and clearly identified proof of mechanisms. The organizational structure and role of the QCP in the drug development process at AstraZeneca will be outlined. The role of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacology scientists in the R&D process will be discussed. Dr. Boulton will provide an example of integrated model-based approaches to answering key clinical questions for AZ’s sodium-glucose linked co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor, dapagliflozin, which is approved for type 2 diabetes mellitus but is now being proposed as a new treatment for heart failure and chronic kidney disease. The QCP-driven modeling approach uses quantitative systems pharmacology, longitudinal pharmacometric, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic, and model-based meta-analysis approaches to provide the organization with a scientific basis on which to invest in these potential new indications without having to conduct expensive and time-consuming Phase 2b studies.

Click here to view webcast.

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