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Sep
18
Wed
Cryptography Roundtable Discussion
Sep 18 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Recent news reports stated that the National Security Agency has pursued new methods that have allowed the agency to monitor telephone and online communication, encrypted information that was thought to be virtually immune to eavesdropping. What steps can and should computer scientists take in response to this privacy threat? How will the recent revelations affect the future of cryptography—the field of encoding and decoding electronic communication and transmissions for the purposes of privacy, reliability and efficiency?

To address these questions, the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute will host an hour-long roundtable discussion, moderated by Anton Dahbura, interim executive director of the Information Security Institute, and Avi Rubin, the institute’s technical director. Other participants will include Johns Hopkins cyber-security experts Matthew Green, Stephen Checkoway and Giuseppe Ateniese.

The event will be streamed live at https://connect.johnshopkins.edu/jhuisicrypto/, and also will be posted online following the event.

 

NOTE: Seating at this public event will be limited. Members of the media who plan to cover the discussion are asked to RSVP to Phil Sneiderman, prs@jhu.edu.

Jul
23
Wed
INBT annual science and engineering film fest
Jul 23 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

It’s movie time! Students from INBT’s summer class Science Communication for Scientists and Engineers: Video News Releases will present their final projects and be available to answer questions. Film topics this year include drug delivery, lab-on-a-chip technology, and how cells become cancerous. Don’t miss this opportunity to see the students’ work up on the big screen. This event is open to the entire Johns Hopkins community.

Sep
23
Tue
Probabilistic Models of Human Language Comprehension, Production, and Acquisition, Roger Levy, University of California, San Deigo
Sep 23 @ 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

Abstract:

Human language acquisition and use are central problems for the advancement of machine intelligence, and pose some of the deepest scientific challenges in accounting for the capabilities of the human mind. In this talk I describe several major advances we have recently made in this domain made possible by combining leading ideas and techniques from computer science and cognitive science. Central to these advances is the use of generative probabilistic models over richly structured linguistic representations. In language comprehension, I describe how we have used these models to develop detailed theories of incremental parsing that unify the central problems of ambiguity resolution, prediction, and syntactic complexity, and that yield compelling quantitative fits to behavioral data from both controlled psycholinguistic experiments and reading of naturalistic text. I also describe noisy-channel models relating the accrual of uncertain perceptual input with sentence-level language comprehension that account for critical outstanding puzzles for previous theories, and that when combined with reinforcement learning yield state-of-the-art models of human eye movement control in reading. This work on comprehension sets the stage for a theory in language production of how speakers tend toward an optimal distribution of information content throughout their utterances, whose predictions we confirm in statistical analysis of a variety of types of optional function word omission. Finally, I conclude with examples of how we use nonparametric models to account for some of the most challenging problems in language acquisition, including how humans learn phonetic category inventories and acquire and rank phonological constraints.

Bio:

Roger Levy is Associate Professor of Linguistics at the University of California, San Diego, where he directs the world’s first Computational Psycholinguistics Laboratory. He received his B.S. from the University of Arizona and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. He was a UK ESRC Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Edinburgh before his current appointment. His awards include an NSF CAREER grant, an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship, and a Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Levy’s research program is devoted to theoretical and applied questions at the intersection of cognition and computation, focusing on human language processing and acquisition. Inherently, linguistic communication involves the resolution of uncertainty over a potentially unbounded set of possible signals and meanings. How can a fixed set of knowledge and resources be acquired and deployed to manage this uncertainty? To address these questions Levy uses a combination of computational modeling and psycholinguistic experimentation. This work furthers our foundational understanding of linguistic cognition, and helps lay the groundwork for future generations of intelligent machines that can communicate with humans via natural language.

Mar
16
Fri
DOM Research Retreat: Re-engineering Medical Discovery
Mar 16 @ 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
DOM Research Retreat: Re-engineering Medical Discovery @ Turner Auditorium/Concourse, Johns Hopkins Medical Campus

The Department of Medicine at Johns Hopkins includes more than 3,600 basic and clinical science researchers at the faculty level; 1,200 graduate and medical students; and 1,400 fellows. The 2018 Department of Medicine Research Retreat is a joint retreat with the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering.

This full-day event will include awards for the best posters, the Levine and Brancati Mentoring Awards, and basic and clinical research presentations by senior Johns Hopkins faculty. Art projects from the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine will be spotlighted in the retreat exhibition area.

Robert Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT, will deliver this year’s keynote lecture. Langer is the author of more than 1,400 articles and the most cited engineer in history (h-index 239). Worldwide, he has in excess of 1,260 issued and pending patents that have been licensed or sublicensed to more than 300 pharmaceutical, chemical, biotechnology, and medical device companies.

Click here to register!

Please contact domretreat@jhmi.edu with questions regarding poster submissions and requirements, the mentoring awards, or retreat registration. 

Mar
1
Fri
2019 DOM/WSE Research Retreat – Thinking Big: Systems Biology to Precisions Medicine
Mar 1 @ 8:00 am – 4:30 pm

The 2019 Department of Medicine Research Retreat is a joint retreat with the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering. Click here to download the save-the-date flyer for this year’s retreat.

Important: There’s still time to register and secure a lunch ticket for the DOM/WSE Research Retreat. Register by 5 p.m. on February 27 to be eligible for a lunch ticket. On-site registrations will not be eligible for lunch tickets.

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