Calendar

To view more alumni events, click here.

Oct
10
Wed
RISE@APL Poster and Information Session 2018
Oct 10 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
RISE@APL Poster and Information Session 2018 @ Glass Pavilion

The Research Internships in Science and Engineering (RISE@APL) program allows highly qualified undergraduate and graduate students from the Whiting School of Engineering and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences the opportunity to conduct research at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.

At this poster and information session, RISE@APL Scholars will present their research findings, while representatives from APL and Johns Hopkins Engineering will be available to answer students’ questions about the application and selection process.

Nov
6
Tue
2018 Charles and Mary O’Melia Lecture in Environmental Science
Nov 6 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Re-Envisioning Wastewater Treatment for the 21st Century

Desmond LawlerDesmond Lawler, PhD
Nassir I. Al-Rashid Chair in Civil Engineering
Professor
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering
The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: The philosophy of municipal wastewater treatment has changed only slowly in the past 100 years. From approximately 1920 to 1970, a wastewater discharge was considered acceptable if the dissolved oxygen level in the receiving stream did not dip below 5 mg/L downstream of the discharge. Protecting aquatic life, particularly fish, from immediate death due to low oxygen levels was the primary motivation and the goal. The passage of the Clean Water Act in 1970 reflected a broader view to include concerns about eutrophication by nutrients and ecological and human health concerns with the naming of “priority pollutants.” Nevertheless, the central concept was that discharge concentrations would be acceptable if they took advantage of the assimilative capacity of receiving waters; that is, if they limited the harm to acceptable values. Now we are embarking on a new philosophy, captured by the phrase “One Water” by the Water Environment Federation, in which we think of wastewater not as a problem for disposal but as a resource.

Why is this shift in philosophy happening? At least two major changes have occurred since the old philosophies were developed. First, a dramatically increased population has led to a substantial increase in “indirect potable reuse” of wastewater, whereby the effluent discharge from one city is a part of the drinking water source for a downstream city. In many areas of the arid Southwest, that “part” can often be nearly 100%. An extension of this trend, due to water shortages, is the drive toward direct potable reuse of wastewater. Second, not only do the chemical and pharmaceutical industries now produce tens of thousands of synthetic chemicals that were not dreamed of when the “priority pollutant” list associated with the Clean Water Act was developed, we now understand that some of these products are endocrine disruptors and others lead to microbial antibiotic resistance.

In this talk, I will try to make the case that wastewater treatment needs to be changed, perhaps radically, to reflect the new philosophy and to meet the needs of the 21st century. The thrust of the presentation will be to explore some possibilities for these radical changes and try to back them up with preliminary engineering calculations.

Nov
7
Wed
Annual Billig-Croft Lecture (Fall 2018)
Nov 7 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

 

David M. Van Wie, PhD, will present “Hypersonics: Back to the Future.”


hypersonicsHypersonics: Back to the Future

Hypersonics is defined as flight at speeds above Mach 5—five times the local speed of sound. Currently, there is a resurgence of interest in hypersonic systems for applications such as weapons, rapid commercial transportation, and space launch. To realize these new applications, technology advancements are needed in the areas of novel thermal protection systems, high-temperature materials, advanced guidance, navigation and control, and propulsion. For more than 60 years, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory have been investigating hypersonic technologies and applications, including Frederick S. Billig’s pioneering development of scramjet engine technology. Dr. Van Wie will offer a brief history of hypersonics highlighting Dr. Billig’s contributions and will discuss ongoing technology development challenges in this area.

Jan
10
Thu
Special Lecture: Breakthrough Technologies for Biodefense
Jan 10 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Brad Ringeisen, deputy director for the Biological Technologies Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, will present “Breakthrough Technologies for Biodefense.” This is a special lecture hosted by the Whiting School of Engineering.

Registration is required.

Feb
17
Sun
2019 Engineers Week
Feb 17 – Feb 23 all-day

Engineers Week is a national, annual celebration of the vital contributions that engineers make to our world. Join us in celebrating with a wide variety of activities on campus.

Visit engineersweek.jhu.edu for a full list of scheduled events.


Featured Events

 

HopHacks

February 15 to 17 // 6:30 p.m. to 2 p.m.
Hodson Hall

Teams of hackers from around the country compete to create the best app in 36 hours at this biannual event.

More Information

 

Aerospace Exploration: Ignite Your Career Possibilities

February 18 // 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Hackerman Hall, Room B-17

Current students and alumni with an interest in the aerospace industry are invited to a dynamic panel discussion hosted by the JHU Aerospace Affinity group. Panelists will provide insight into a variety of aerospace career paths for all engineering disciplines.

Click Here to Register

 

Theta Tau’s Tower of Power

February 19 // Doors Open: 5 p.m. // Competition Begins: 5:30 p.m.
Glass Pavilion

Teams compete to build the tallest towers out of dry pasta and marshmallows. Teams must register in advance.

Registration Required

 

Salary Negotiation for Women in Industry

February 20 // 6 to 8 p.m.
The Great Hall in Levering

At this panel discussion hosted by the Whiting School and the Homewood Career Center, panelists will discuss the key techniques needed to help women engineers identify their value and negotiate their worth during the interview process.

Click Here to Register

 

 

Speed Networking Night

February 21 // 6:30 to 9 p.m.
Glass Pavilion

Students will rotate through quick, one-on-one interviews with alumni, followed by an open networking reception.

Registration Required

 

 

Engineering a Successful Future in STEM

February 22 // 8 a.m. to 2:15 p.m.
Barclay Elementary/Middle School

JHU student groups and faculty members will teach middle school students about engineering careers through presentations and hands-on activities. This event is part of the Barclay-Hopkins STEM partnership and is not open to the public.

Feb
27
Wed
2019 Ilene Busch-Vishniac Lecture – “From Hopkins BME to Columbia Surgeon: An Unexpected Journey”
Feb 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
2019 Ilene Busch-Vishniac Lecture - "From Hopkins BME to Columbia Surgeon: An Unexpected Journey" @ The Eisenhower Room (The Johns Hopkins Club)

Beth Schrope, MD, PhD, will deliver the 2019 Ilene Busch-Vishniac Lecture on Wednesday, Feb. 27.

Schrope, who is an associate professor of surgery at Columbia University Medical Center and an associate professor of clinical surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian, will detail an unlikely journey from Hopkins BME to Ivy League surgeon, with the purpose of demonstrating goal-directed living with the allowance for a more opportunistic approach to life and career.

Mar
1
Fri
2019 DOM/WSE Research Retreat – Thinking Big: Systems Biology to Precisions Medicine
Mar 1 @ 8:00 am – 4:30 pm

The 2019 Department of Medicine Research Retreat is a joint retreat with the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering. Click here to download the save-the-date flyer for this year’s retreat.

Important: There’s still time to register and secure a lunch ticket for the DOM/WSE Research Retreat. Register by 5 p.m. on February 27 to be eligible for a lunch ticket. On-site registrations will not be eligible for lunch tickets.

Apr
18
Thu
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Rachel Karchin
Apr 18 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Rachel Karchin @ Mason Hall Auditorium

Rachel Karchin will deliver a lecture titled “Computational modeling of cancer precursor lesion evolution” as part of the Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series. Karchin is a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Genome sequencing studies of tumor samples from large patient cohorts have provided convincing support for the somatic mutation theory of cancer, which posits that neoplasms result from mutational activation of oncogenes and mutational inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Tumor cells originating from the same ancestral lineage form clonal populations, and the size and time-ordering of the clones can be modeled by hierarchical tree structures. In this lecture, Professor Karchin will discuss her research group’s reconstructions of precursor lesion evolution in high grade serous ovarian cancer and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.


The Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series began in 1993 as a way to honor newly promoted full professors. Professor Giddens, originator of the series, served as the fifth dean of Engineering at Johns Hopkins.

Apr
26
Fri
2019 JHU Business Plan Competition
Apr 26 all-day

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted by the Center for Leadership Education, provides an opportunity for students to take a novel idea or innovative technology and develop a business plan based around it. Starting with a concept, students build an understanding of their target market, analyze potential competitors, craft an effective market entry strategy, and present their plans to industry professionals and venture capitalists. This highly popular event, held on the Homewood campus, draws teams from all divisions of the university.

Visit the JHU Business Plan Competition website for more information.

May
3
Fri
13th Annual Nano-Bio Symposium
May 3 all-day

The Annual Nano-Bio Symposium is a showcase and celebration of the latest discoveries in nanoscience from our multidisciplinary research teams at the Institute for NanoBioTechnology. It brings students and top scholars from Hopkins, other institutions, and industry together to network, share knowledge and ideas, and foster new collaborations.

The theme for the 2019 Nano-Bio Symposium is Translation of Nano & Bio Research.

Visit inbt.jhu.edu/symposium for more information.

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