Calendar

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May
7
Mon
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Joel Bader
May 7 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Joel Bader @ Mason Hall Auditorium

Joel Bader will deliver a lecture as part of the Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series. Bader is a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Stopping Cancer Metastasis

Cancer’s lethality comes not from the growth of the original tumor, but from the spread of the disease to distant sites in the body. Professor Bader will describe ongoing work to dissect the gene and protein networks driving cancer metastasis, suggesting targets for therapeutic intervention.


The Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series began in 1993 as a way to honor newly promoted full professors. Professor Giddens, originator of the series, served as the fifth dean of Engineering at Johns Hopkins.

May
8
Tue
2018 Johns Hopkins Engineering Design Day
May 8 @ 9:00 am – 6:00 pm
2018 Johns Hopkins Engineering Design Day @ Johns Hopkins University

Celebrate the innovation of Johns Hopkins Engineering students as they showcase their ability to apply knowledge and skills to tackle real-world challenges.

The Whiting School of Engineering’s Design Day is the culmination of the Johns Hopkins translational education experience and provides students with the opportunity to display their research, engineering solutions, and prototypes.

Alumni and guests are welcome at all department events.

View the full Design Day schedule!
May
14
Mon
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Noah Cowan
May 14 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Noah Cowan @ Mason Hall Auditorium

Noah Cowan will deliver a lecture as part of the Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series. Cowan is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Neuroscience in The Matrix

Understanding how the nervous system encodes and processes sensory information, transforms it into meaningful intermediate representations in the brain, and computes motor output involves decoding a complex closed-loop control system. Professor Cowan will present research devoted to developing and applying ideas in engineering to decode closed-loop neuromechanical control in animals, including humans.


The Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series began in 1993 as a way to honor newly promoted full professors. Professor Giddens, originator of the series, served as the fifth dean of Engineering at Johns Hopkins.

May
15
Tue
SABES STEM Showcase Spring 2018
May 15 @ 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm
SABES STEM Showcase Spring 2018 @ Baltimore Polytechnic Institute/Western High School | Baltimore | Maryland | United States

Come see SABES students present their hands-on STEM projects and meet Captain Barrington Irving, who will share his personal journal to becoming a world-renowned pilot whose adventures have taken him around the world to investigate STEM challenges.

Jul
20
Fri
Engineering Innovation: 2018 Spaghetti Bridge Competition
Jul 20 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Engineering Innovation: 2018 Spaghetti Bridge Competition @ 110 Hodson Hall and 227 Bloomberg Center

More than 100 high school students will put their skills to the test as they square off in a competition to build the strongest bridge out of a brittle substance: dry spaghetti.

The Spaghetti Bridge Competition is the culmination of the four-week Engineering Innovation program that attracts students from 18 states and 11 countries to Johns Hopkins.

Sep
7
Fri
MedHacks 2018
Sep 7 – Sep 9 all-day
MedHacks 2018 @ Johns Hopkins Hospital

What if the most creative minds channeled their focus into solving the most impactful problems of today? Imagine if we could apply the ingenuity that powers the most profound technology into the most fundamental of all human concerns: health. MedHacks is the start. Join us for our medical hackathon and design competition at the world’s pinnacle of medical care—Johns Hopkins University.

Experts and students in the field of medicine will meet to identify healthcare problems across the globe. Hackers from all disciplines, skill levels, and locations will unite to develop solutions to these problems.

For 36 hours, these hackers and doctors will bring their ideas to fruition. At the end of the event, they will have the opportunity to present their solutions to the judges and the world.

Learn More
Sep
14
Fri
HopHacks Fall 2018
Sep 14 – Sep 16 all-day
HopHacks Fall 2018 @ Johns Hopkins University

HopHacks is the biannual hackathon hosted at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. For 36 hours students work in teams of up to four people, to bring a software or hardware idea to life. Last spring, we gathered more than 360 of the most creative and talented students from JHU, MIT, UMD, CMU, Rutgers, NYU, and many more. This September 14 through 16, we expect to host even more students from institutions across the country and welcome you to join the HopHacks community.

Learn More
Nov
6
Tue
2018 Charles and Mary O’Melia Lecture in Environmental Science
Nov 6 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Re-Envisioning Wastewater Treatment for the 21st Century

Desmond LawlerDesmond Lawler, PhD
Nassir I. Al-Rashid Chair in Civil Engineering
Professor
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering
The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: The philosophy of municipal wastewater treatment has changed only slowly in the past 100 years. From approximately 1920 to 1970, a wastewater discharge was considered acceptable if the dissolved oxygen level in the receiving stream did not dip below 5 mg/L downstream of the discharge. Protecting aquatic life, particularly fish, from immediate death due to low oxygen levels was the primary motivation and the goal. The passage of the Clean Water Act in 1970 reflected a broader view to include concerns about eutrophication by nutrients and ecological and human health concerns with the naming of “priority pollutants.” Nevertheless, the central concept was that discharge concentrations would be acceptable if they took advantage of the assimilative capacity of receiving waters; that is, if they limited the harm to acceptable values. Now we are embarking on a new philosophy, captured by the phrase “One Water” by the Water Environment Federation, in which we think of wastewater not as a problem for disposal but as a resource.

Why is this shift in philosophy happening? At least two major changes have occurred since the old philosophies were developed. First, a dramatically increased population has led to a substantial increase in “indirect potable reuse” of wastewater, whereby the effluent discharge from one city is a part of the drinking water source for a downstream city. In many areas of the arid Southwest, that “part” can often be nearly 100%. An extension of this trend, due to water shortages, is the drive toward direct potable reuse of wastewater. Second, not only do the chemical and pharmaceutical industries now produce tens of thousands of synthetic chemicals that were not dreamed of when the “priority pollutant” list associated with the Clean Water Act was developed, we now understand that some of these products are endocrine disruptors and others lead to microbial antibiotic resistance.

In this talk, I will try to make the case that wastewater treatment needs to be changed, perhaps radically, to reflect the new philosophy and to meet the needs of the 21st century. The thrust of the presentation will be to explore some possibilities for these radical changes and try to back them up with preliminary engineering calculations.

Nov
7
Wed
Annual Billig-Croft Lecture (Fall 2018)
Nov 7 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

 

David M. Van Wie, PhD, will present “Hypersonics: Back to the Future.”


hypersonicsHypersonics: Back to the Future

Hypersonics is defined as flight at speeds above Mach 5—five times the local speed of sound. Currently, there is a resurgence of interest in hypersonic systems for applications such as weapons, rapid commercial transportation, and space launch. To realize these new applications, technology advancements are needed in the areas of novel thermal protection systems, high-temperature materials, advanced guidance, navigation and control, and propulsion. For more than 60 years, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory have been investigating hypersonic technologies and applications, including Frederick S. Billig’s pioneering development of scramjet engine technology. Dr. Van Wie will offer a brief history of hypersonics highlighting Dr. Billig’s contributions and will discuss ongoing technology development challenges in this area.

Nov
19
Mon
2018 Research Symposium on Engineering in Healthcare: Engineering for an Aging Society
Nov 19 @ 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

The annual Johns Hopkins Research Symposium on Engineering in Healthcare brings together experts who advocate for leveraging new and emerging technologies to deliver better health care. We invite all Johns Hopkins faculty, researchers, students, staff and clinicians, as well as industry representatives, to join us at the symposium this fall.

Visit the symposium website for more information about this year’s program.

RSVP HERE

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