Calendar

To view more alumni events, click here.

May
7
Mon
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Joel Bader
May 7 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Joel Bader @ Mason Hall Auditorium

Joel Bader will deliver a lecture as part of the Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series. Bader is a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Stopping Cancer Metastasis

Cancer’s lethality comes not from the growth of the original tumor, but from the spread of the disease to distant sites in the body. Professor Bader will describe ongoing work to dissect the gene and protein networks driving cancer metastasis, suggesting targets for therapeutic intervention.


The Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series began in 1993 as a way to honor newly promoted full professors. Professor Giddens, originator of the series, served as the fifth dean of Engineering at Johns Hopkins.

2018 Convocation Awards Ceremony
May 7 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

This annual celebration of student and faculty achievement at the Whiting School of Engineering is open to award recipients and their families only.

May
8
Tue
2018 Johns Hopkins Engineering Design Day
May 8 @ 9:00 am – 6:00 pm
2018 Johns Hopkins Engineering Design Day @ Johns Hopkins University

Celebrate the innovation of Johns Hopkins Engineering students as they showcase their ability to apply knowledge and skills to tackle real-world challenges.

The Whiting School of Engineering’s Design Day is the culmination of the Johns Hopkins translational education experience and provides students with the opportunity to display their research, engineering solutions, and prototypes.

Alumni and guests are welcome at all department events.

View the full Design Day schedule!
May
14
Mon
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Noah Cowan
May 14 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Noah Cowan @ Mason Hall Auditorium

Noah Cowan will deliver a lecture as part of the Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series. Cowan is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Neuroscience in The Matrix

Understanding how the nervous system encodes and processes sensory information, transforms it into meaningful intermediate representations in the brain, and computes motor output involves decoding a complex closed-loop control system. Professor Cowan will present research devoted to developing and applying ideas in engineering to decode closed-loop neuromechanical control in animals, including humans.


The Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series began in 1993 as a way to honor newly promoted full professors. Professor Giddens, originator of the series, served as the fifth dean of Engineering at Johns Hopkins.

May
22
Tue
2018 Master’s Diploma Ceremony
May 22 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

The Whiting School of Engineering Master’s Diploma Ceremony celebrates all Johns Hopkins Engineering master’s degree and certificate graduates (from both the full-time and part-time programs).

Click here for more information, including directions, parking information, expected time of arrival for graduates, and live stream information for friends and family unable to attend.

 

2018 Doctoral Hooding Ceremony
May 22 @ 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

The Whiting School of Engineering and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences will hold their fourth Annual Homewood Schools’ Doctoral Hooding Ceremony to honor our students who either have or will be completing their doctoral degrees (summer and fall 2017 and spring 2018). The ceremony will take place from 3 to 6 pm. on Tuesday, May 22, in the Ralph S. O’Connor Recreation Center, with a reception to follow onsite.

All eligible students who wish to participate in the hooding ceremony—and faculty advisers who plan to hood their students—must register to attend the ceremony.

Visit the PhD Hooding Ceremony website for more information or to register.

May
24
Thu
2018 Universitywide Commencement Ceremony
May 24 @ 1:30 pm – 5:30 pm

All graduates are invited to attend the universitywide Commencement ceremony at 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 24, at Royal Farms Arena. Bachelor’s degree and doctoral candidates will be called to cross the stage at the universitywide ceremony. This is the main ceremony for bachelor’s candidates.

Visit the JHU Commencement website for more information.

Jun
25
Mon
Fifth Frederick Jelinek Memorial Summer Workshop
Jun 25 – Aug 3 all-day

This is the fifth in a series of six-week-long research workshops on Machine Learning for Speech Language and Computer Vision Technology. These workshops bring together diverse “dream teams” of leading professionals, graduate students, and undergraduates, in a truly cooperative, intensive, and substantive effort to advance the state of the science.

These workshops constitute a continuation of the well known Johns Hopkins University summer workshops, and encompasses all areas of human language technology including automatic speech recognition, natural language processing, machine translation, topic detection and tracking, information retrieval and extraction, summarization and question answering, and certain related areas of computer vision, including image understanding and visual scene analysis. These fields share many important algorithmic and statistical approaches, allowing cross-fertilization. Machine learning challenges that arise from these areas are of fundamental scientific interest and are shared with many other fields of science and engineering, such as medical-/bio-informatics and social network analysis.

The primary goals of the workshop series are to advance basic science, attract students to the field and prepare them for research by putting them to work on exciting problems alongside senior researchers in a highly collaborative environment. Creation of research infrastructure and lasting collaborations are secondary goals.

Visit clsp.jhu.edu to learn more >>

Oct
10
Wed
RISE@APL Poster and Information Session 2018
Oct 10 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
RISE@APL Poster and Information Session 2018 @ Glass Pavilion

The Research Internships in Science and Engineering (RISE@APL) program allows highly qualified undergraduate and graduate students from the Whiting School of Engineering and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences the opportunity to conduct research at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.

At this poster and information session, RISE@APL Scholars will present their research findings, while representatives from APL and Johns Hopkins Engineering will be available to answer students’ questions about the application and selection process.

Nov
6
Tue
2018 Charles and Mary O’Melia Lecture in Environmental Science
Nov 6 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Re-Envisioning Wastewater Treatment for the 21st Century

Desmond LawlerDesmond Lawler, PhD
Nassir I. Al-Rashid Chair in Civil Engineering
Professor
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering
The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: The philosophy of municipal wastewater treatment has changed only slowly in the past 100 years. From approximately 1920 to 1970, a wastewater discharge was considered acceptable if the dissolved oxygen level in the receiving stream did not dip below 5 mg/L downstream of the discharge. Protecting aquatic life, particularly fish, from immediate death due to low oxygen levels was the primary motivation and the goal. The passage of the Clean Water Act in 1970 reflected a broader view to include concerns about eutrophication by nutrients and ecological and human health concerns with the naming of “priority pollutants.” Nevertheless, the central concept was that discharge concentrations would be acceptable if they took advantage of the assimilative capacity of receiving waters; that is, if they limited the harm to acceptable values. Now we are embarking on a new philosophy, captured by the phrase “One Water” by the Water Environment Federation, in which we think of wastewater not as a problem for disposal but as a resource.

Why is this shift in philosophy happening? At least two major changes have occurred since the old philosophies were developed. First, a dramatically increased population has led to a substantial increase in “indirect potable reuse” of wastewater, whereby the effluent discharge from one city is a part of the drinking water source for a downstream city. In many areas of the arid Southwest, that “part” can often be nearly 100%. An extension of this trend, due to water shortages, is the drive toward direct potable reuse of wastewater. Second, not only do the chemical and pharmaceutical industries now produce tens of thousands of synthetic chemicals that were not dreamed of when the “priority pollutant” list associated with the Clean Water Act was developed, we now understand that some of these products are endocrine disruptors and others lead to microbial antibiotic resistance.

In this talk, I will try to make the case that wastewater treatment needs to be changed, perhaps radically, to reflect the new philosophy and to meet the needs of the 21st century. The thrust of the presentation will be to explore some possibilities for these radical changes and try to back them up with preliminary engineering calculations.

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