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Feb
18
Sun
2018 Engineers Week
Feb 18 – Feb 24 all-day

Please join us in celebrating National Engineers Week, February 18 to 24, with a wide variety of activities on campus.

Featured Events

 

Salary Negotiation for Women In Industry

BEING RESCHEDULED
Glass Pavilion
Alumni experts offer targeted, successful salary-negotiation strategies and techniques.
Please register.

Theta Tau’s Tower of Power

Tuesday, Feb. 20 || Doors open at 5 p.m.; Competition from 5:30 to 6 p.m.
Glass Pavilion
Teams compete to build the tallest towers out of dry pasta and marshmallows. Teams must register in advance.
Please register.

Engineering to Discover the History of the Universe

Wednesday, Feb. 21 || Noon to 2:30 p.m.
Glass Pavilion
Nobel Prize-winning NASA astrophysicist John Mather will discuss how engineering is the basis of space-age science and will show some of the key inventions that make the James Webb Space Telescope possible.
Please register.

Speed Networking Night

Thursday, Feb. 22 || 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Glass Pavilion
Students will rotate through quick, one-on-one interviews with alumni, followed by an open networking reception.
Registration required.

Engineering A Successful Future in STEM

Friday, Feb. 23 || 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Barclay Elementary/Middle School
Professional engineers, JHU faculty and student groups will teach 6th-8th graders about engineering careers through presentations and hands-on activities. (Event is part of the Barclay-Hopkins STEM partnership and not open to the public.)

View the full event listing!
Apr
18
Thu
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Rachel Karchin
Apr 18 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Inaugural Professorial Lecture: Rachel Karchin @ Mason Hall Auditorium

Rachel Karchin will deliver a lecture titled “Computational modeling of cancer precursor lesion evolution” as part of the Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series. Karchin is a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Genome sequencing studies of tumor samples from large patient cohorts have provided convincing support for the somatic mutation theory of cancer, which posits that neoplasms result from mutational activation of oncogenes and mutational inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Tumor cells originating from the same ancestral lineage form clonal populations, and the size and time-ordering of the clones can be modeled by hierarchical tree structures. In this lecture, Professor Karchin will discuss her research group’s reconstructions of precursor lesion evolution in high grade serous ovarian cancer and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.


The Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series began in 1993 as a way to honor newly promoted full professors. Professor Giddens, originator of the series, served as the fifth dean of Engineering at Johns Hopkins.

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