Calendar

To view more alumni events, click here.

Apr
12
Thu
2018 Harriet Shriver Rogers Lecture
Apr 12 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

The 2018 Harriet Shriver Rogers Lecture will be held on Thursday, April 12, 2018. The lecture begins at 4:30 p.m. in 316 Hodson Hall. Alumnus Benjamin Lowe will present “Quints, Quants, Quarks, Quirks, and QED.”


Benjamin LoweBenjamin Lowe

Senior Manager/Associate Director

Verizon Wireless

 

“Quints, Quants, Quarks, Quirks and QED”
This talk is about five roommates from Wolman Hall who graduated from Johns Hopkins with engineering degrees. Over the next 30 years, their careers developed in different directions with each finding success—Krishnan Rajagopalan becomes the CEO of a premier executive search firm; Ed Pribitkin becomes the chief medical officer of a major university; Mark Vargus becomes the mayor of a town in Texas, as well as a popular accounting professor; and Greg Doudnikoff becomes an IP patent attorney for a major lab. Learn how our career paths were similar and how and where they diverged. Also, learn how, as undergraduates, we held ourselves together and created a competitive environment based on mutual interests, friendship, and intramural sports.

 

Apr
27
Fri
2018 Business Plan Competition
Apr 27 all-day
2018 Business Plan Competition @ Charles Commons

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted by the Center for Leadership Education, provides an opportunity for students to take a novel idea or innovative technology and develop a business plan based around it. Starting with a concept, students build an understanding of their target market, analyze potential competitors, craft an effective market entry strategy, and present their plans to industry professionals and venture capitalists. This highly popular event, held on the Homewood campus, draws teams from all divisions of the university.

The 19th Annual Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, sponsored by the Center for Leadership Education, will run from February through April 27, 2018.

Visit the JHU Business Plan Competition website for more information.

Nov
6
Tue
2018 Charles and Mary O’Melia Lecture in Environmental Science
Nov 6 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Re-Envisioning Wastewater Treatment for the 21st Century

Desmond LawlerDesmond Lawler, PhD
Nassir I. Al-Rashid Chair in Civil Engineering
Professor
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering
The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: The philosophy of municipal wastewater treatment has changed only slowly in the past 100 years. From approximately 1920 to 1970, a wastewater discharge was considered acceptable if the dissolved oxygen level in the receiving stream did not dip below 5 mg/L downstream of the discharge. Protecting aquatic life, particularly fish, from immediate death due to low oxygen levels was the primary motivation and the goal. The passage of the Clean Water Act in 1970 reflected a broader view to include concerns about eutrophication by nutrients and ecological and human health concerns with the naming of “priority pollutants.” Nevertheless, the central concept was that discharge concentrations would be acceptable if they took advantage of the assimilative capacity of receiving waters; that is, if they limited the harm to acceptable values. Now we are embarking on a new philosophy, captured by the phrase “One Water” by the Water Environment Federation, in which we think of wastewater not as a problem for disposal but as a resource.

Why is this shift in philosophy happening? At least two major changes have occurred since the old philosophies were developed. First, a dramatically increased population has led to a substantial increase in “indirect potable reuse” of wastewater, whereby the effluent discharge from one city is a part of the drinking water source for a downstream city. In many areas of the arid Southwest, that “part” can often be nearly 100%. An extension of this trend, due to water shortages, is the drive toward direct potable reuse of wastewater. Second, not only do the chemical and pharmaceutical industries now produce tens of thousands of synthetic chemicals that were not dreamed of when the “priority pollutant” list associated with the Clean Water Act was developed, we now understand that some of these products are endocrine disruptors and others lead to microbial antibiotic resistance.

In this talk, I will try to make the case that wastewater treatment needs to be changed, perhaps radically, to reflect the new philosophy and to meet the needs of the 21st century. The thrust of the presentation will be to explore some possibilities for these radical changes and try to back them up with preliminary engineering calculations.

Apr
26
Fri
2019 JHU Business Plan Competition
Apr 26 all-day

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted by the Center for Leadership Education, provides an opportunity for students to take a novel idea or innovative technology and develop a business plan based around it. Starting with a concept, students build an understanding of their target market, analyze potential competitors, craft an effective market entry strategy, and present their plans to industry professionals and venture capitalists. This highly popular event, held on the Homewood campus, draws teams from all divisions of the university.

Visit the JHU Business Plan Competition website for more information.

Back to top