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Jul
24
Fri
Engineering Innovation’s Tenth Annual Spaghetti Bridge Competition
Jul 24 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Engineering Innovation: Spaghetti Bridge Competition

Engineering Innovation: Spaghetti Bridge Competition

The Whiting School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University cordially invites family, friends, and sponsors of our Engineering Innovation students to the Tenth Annual Spaghetti Bridge Competition, where students put their creativity and newly learned engineering skills to the test!

Oct
5
Thu
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture: “Why Data Citation is a Computational Problem”
Oct 5 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

The Johns Hopkins Department of Computer Science will host Susan B. Davidson, the Weiss Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, as part of the Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series.

 

Abstract

“Why Data Citation is a Computational Problem”

Most information is now published in complex, structured, evolving datasets or databases. As such, there is increasing demand that this digital information should be treated in the same way as conventional publications and cited appropriately. While principles and standards have been developed for data citation, they are unlikely to be used unless we can couple the process of extracting information with that of providing a citation for it. In this talk, Davidson will discuss the problem of automatically generating citations for data in a database given how the data was obtained (the query) as well as the content (the data), and show how the problem of generating a citation is related to two well-studied problems in databases: query rewriting using views and provenance.

Nov
6
Tue
2018 Charles and Mary O’Melia Lecture in Environmental Science
Nov 6 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Re-Envisioning Wastewater Treatment for the 21st Century

Desmond LawlerDesmond Lawler, PhD
Nassir I. Al-Rashid Chair in Civil Engineering
Professor
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering
The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: The philosophy of municipal wastewater treatment has changed only slowly in the past 100 years. From approximately 1920 to 1970, a wastewater discharge was considered acceptable if the dissolved oxygen level in the receiving stream did not dip below 5 mg/L downstream of the discharge. Protecting aquatic life, particularly fish, from immediate death due to low oxygen levels was the primary motivation and the goal. The passage of the Clean Water Act in 1970 reflected a broader view to include concerns about eutrophication by nutrients and ecological and human health concerns with the naming of “priority pollutants.” Nevertheless, the central concept was that discharge concentrations would be acceptable if they took advantage of the assimilative capacity of receiving waters; that is, if they limited the harm to acceptable values. Now we are embarking on a new philosophy, captured by the phrase “One Water” by the Water Environment Federation, in which we think of wastewater not as a problem for disposal but as a resource.

Why is this shift in philosophy happening? At least two major changes have occurred since the old philosophies were developed. First, a dramatically increased population has led to a substantial increase in “indirect potable reuse” of wastewater, whereby the effluent discharge from one city is a part of the drinking water source for a downstream city. In many areas of the arid Southwest, that “part” can often be nearly 100%. An extension of this trend, due to water shortages, is the drive toward direct potable reuse of wastewater. Second, not only do the chemical and pharmaceutical industries now produce tens of thousands of synthetic chemicals that were not dreamed of when the “priority pollutant” list associated with the Clean Water Act was developed, we now understand that some of these products are endocrine disruptors and others lead to microbial antibiotic resistance.

In this talk, I will try to make the case that wastewater treatment needs to be changed, perhaps radically, to reflect the new philosophy and to meet the needs of the 21st century. The thrust of the presentation will be to explore some possibilities for these radical changes and try to back them up with preliminary engineering calculations.

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