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May
2
Fri
Association for Computing Machinery’s Annual Lecture in Memory of Nathan Krasnopoler
May 2 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Greg Kroah-Hartman

Greg Kroah-Hartman

The Association for Computing Machinery’s Annual Lecture in Memory of Nathan Krasnopoler will be held at 4 p.m. on Friday, May 2 in Hackerman Hall B-17 on the Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus.

Speaker Greg Kroah-Hartman of the Linux Foundation will speak on “The Linux Kernal: too fast and too big to be correct.” In his talk, Kroah-Hartman will discuss details of Linux kernel development, the current rate of change, who is doing the work and how all this goes against “everything you have learned in school about doing software development.” Kroah-Hartman also will introduce the audience members to ways they can get involved in Linux kernel development.

This lecture is sponsored by the Nathan Krasnopoler Memorial Fund, established at the Whiting School of Engineering to benefit the Johns Hopkins’ chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery.  For more information: Association for Computing Machinery’s Annual Lecture in Memory of Nathan Krasnopoler

 

Sep
15
Mon
9/15: David Gracias Presents Inaugural Professorial Lecture, “Big Ideas in a Small World”
Sep 15 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

David Gracias, Russell Croft Faculty Scholar and professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, will present “Big Ideas in a Small World” from 3 to 5 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 15 in Mason Hall Auditorium as part of the Fall 2014 Don P. Giddens Inaugural Professorial Lecture Series.

David Gracias

David Gracias

Gracias will discuss how engineering three-dimensional devices at the nanometer length scale promises revolutionary advances in optics, electronics and medicine.

 

Dec
7
Mon
ACM’s Annual Lecture in Memory of Nathan Krasnopoler
Dec 7 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

The Association for Computing Machinery’s Annual Lecture in Memory of Nathan Krasnopoler will be held at 4 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 7 in Hackerman Hall B-17 on the Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus.

Mike AmbinderMike Ambinder, a senior experimental psychologist at Valve, will deliver a lecture titled “Shipping Something: How Valve Makes Products and How You Can, Too.” The talk will walk listeners through the process that Valve (developer of Half-Life, Team Fortress, DOTA and more) uses to create, iterate, and ship its products, and how that process can yield the skills and experience necessary to succeed in the software industry. The key “takeaway” from this lecture is that what works for Valve can also work for undergraduates looking for their first jobs, and can help them develop the ability to get where they want to go.

This lecture is sponsored by the Nathan Krasnopoler Memorial Fund, established at the Whiting School of Engineering to benefit the Johns Hopkins’ chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery.

 

Sep
6
Tue
ICM Distinguised Seminar Series presents “Mining Big Data for Molecular Marker Detection”
Sep 6 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Photo of Su-In LeeSu-In Lee, assistant professor of computer science and engineering and genome sciences at the University of Washington, will present “Mining Big Data for Molecular Marker Detection.”

AbstractThe repertoire of drugs for patients with cancer is rapidly expanding. However, cancers that appear pathologically similar often respond differently to the same drug regimens. Methods to better match patients to specific drugs are in high demand. There is a fair amount of data on molecular profiles from patients with cancer. The most important step necessary to realize the ultimate goal is to identify molecular markers in these data that predict the response to each of hundreds of chemotherapy drugs. However, due to the high-dimensionality (i.e., the number of variables is much greater than the number of samples) along with potential biological or experimental confounders, it is an open challenge to identify robust biomarkers that are replicated across different studies.

In this talk, Lee will present two distinct machine learning techniques to resolve these challenges. These methods learn the low-dimensional features that are likely to represent important molecular events in the disease process in an unsupervised fashion, based on molecular profiles from multiple populations of patients with specific cancer types. Lee will present two applications of these two methods: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and ovarian cancer. When the first method was applied to AML data in collaboration with UW Hematology and UW’s Center for Cancer Innovation, a novel molecular marker for topoisomerase inhibitors, widely used chemotherapy drugs in AML treatment, was revealed. The other method applied to ovarian cancer data led to a potential molecular driver for tumor-associated stroma, in collaboration with UW Pathology and UW Genome Sciences. These methods are general computational frameworks and can be applied to many other diseases.

For those who cannot make it to the Homewood campus, the seminar will be video-conferenced to Traylor 709 on the School of Medicine campus.

For those who attend at Homewood, lunch will be provided at noon.

Apr
14
Fri
Canceled – Robert Nerem presents “Regenerative Medicine: The Hype, the Hope, and the Future”
Apr 14 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Canceled - Robert Nerem presents "Regenerative Medicine: The Hype, the Hope, and the Future" @ 26 Mudd Hall

This event has been canceled.

Robert M. Nerem (Georgia Institute of Technology) presents “Regenerative Medicine: The Hype, the Hope, and the Future” as part of a special seminar hosted by the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, and the Translational Tissue Engineering Center.

Abstract: Although the underlying concepts of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine go back more than 75 years, the term tissue engineering actually was only “coined” in the 1980s. This was followed by the 1990s being the “go-go” years with stem cells emerging as a technology, an industry developing, and the term regenerative medicine beginning to be used. There also was a lot of hype, and following the turn of the century the field entered what might be called the “sobering” years, with private sector activity falling significantly even though the science continued to advance. The last decade, however, has all the marks of being “back to the future.” Advances in cell-based therapies have been fueled by advances in stem cell science and technology and the discovery of what is required to reprogram somatic cells into stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. For cellular therapies, a key question is what is the mechanism of action? For a specific therapy, is the mechanism one of cell replacement or is it a paracrine effect? If the latter, is it possible that one could introduce the appropriate biological signals without the use of cells? In this case the discussion shifts from “my cell is better than your cell” to “my biological signals are better than yours.” Whatever the case, one of the “holy grails” is the neurodegenerative diseases/disorders and the repair/regeneration of the central nervous system. Instead of the mixture of hype and hope in the past, and with an aging population providing the threat of a “tsunami” of neural disorders, regenerative medicine offers the real possibility of cures to these diseases/disorders in the future.

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