Calendar

To view more alumni events, click here.

Feb
24
Wed
E-Week ’16: BME EDGE Speaker Series presents David Narrow
Feb 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

David Narrow, CBID BME alumnusBME CBID alumnus David Narrow, MS ’13, CEO of Sonavex, Inc. and recently named one of Forbes’ “30 Under 30” in the health care industry, will speak on his experience founding and building a startup. A Q & A session will follow.

Register by midnight on Monday, Feb. 21 to reserve your space.

Hosted by BME EDGE.

Mar
23
Wed
UCLA’s Chih-Ming Ho, PhD ’74, to present 2016 Billig-Croft Lecture
Mar 23 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Annual Billig-Croft Lecture will be held at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, March 23 in Hackerman Hall on the Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus.

Chih-MingHoChih-Ming Ho, PhD ’74,  will discuss “Phenotypic Personalized Medicine: When Engineering Meets Medicine.” He holds the Ben Rich-Lockheed Martin Chair Professor in UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

His research  program addresses emerging platforms for personalized medicine, control of complex systems, microfluidics, and turbulence, and he was ranked by the Institute for Scientific Information as one of the top 250 most cited researchers worldwide in the entire engineering category.

Please RSVP.

The Billig-Croft lecture is delivered annually in honor of Frederick S. Billig, PhD ’55 and was established by L. Gordon Croft ’56.

Apr
7
Thu
Emergency Zika Design Challenge: Preventing Mosquito Bites
Apr 7 @ 5:00 pm – Apr 10 @ 3:00 pm

CBID- Jhpiego Zika Emergency Design Challenge Poster FINAL March 28[1]An “Emergency Zika Design Challenge: Preventing Mosquito Bites” event will be held from Thursday, April 7 through Saturday, April 9 in the BME Design Studio in Clark Hall on the Johns Hopkins Homewood campus. The event is a project of the Department of  Biomedical Engineering, the Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design, and Jhpiego. Registration required.

Click on the poster to the left for details of each day’s activities, and who should consider attending.

Apr
4
Tue
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents “Steering Cancer Evolution: Harnessing Phenotypic Heterogeneity to Design Better Therapies”
Apr 4 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents "Steering Cancer Evolution: Harnessing Phenotypic Heterogeneity to Design Better Therapies" @ 110 Clark Hall, Johns Hopkins Homewood campus

Alexander, R.A. Anderson, the co-director of Integrated Mathematical Oncology and senior member of the Moffitt Cancer Center, will present on April 4, 2017, as part of the Institute for Computational Medicine’s Distinguished Seminar Series. The title of his presentation is “Steering Cancer Evolution: Harnessing Phenotypic Heterogeneity to Design Better Therapies.”

The seminar begins at 11 a.m. in Clark Hall 110 on the Homewood campus, and it will be video-teleconferenced to Traylor 709 on the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine campus. Click here to view webcast. Lunch will provided to those in attendance on the Homewood campus.

 

Abstract: Heterogeneity in cancer is an observed fact, both genetically and phenotypically. Cell-to-cell variation is seen in all aspects of cancer, from early development to invasion and subsequent metastasis. This heterogeneity is also at the heart of why many cancer treatments fail, as it facilitates the emergence of drug resistance. The complex spatial and temporal process by which tumors initiate, grow and evolve is a major focus of the oncology community and one that requires the integration of multiple disciplines. Tumor heterogeneity at the tissue scale is largely due to ecological variations in 
terms of the tumor habitat driven by spatially heterogeneous vascularity, which is
readily observed on cross sectional imaging. Molecular techniques have 
historically averaged genomic signals from large numbers of cells obtained in a 
single biopsy site, thus smoothing and potentially hiding underlying spatial 
variations. The complex dialogue between tumor cells and
 environment that produces intra- and inter-tumoral heterogeneity is
fundamentally governed by Darwinian dynamics. That is, local micro-
environmental conditions select phenotypic clones that are best adapted to
 survive and proliferate and, conversely, the phenotypic properties of the cells affect the 
environmental properties. While these complex interactions have enormous 
clinical implications because they promote resistance to therapy, the dynamics 
are impossible to fully capture via experimentation alone.

Here we present an integrated theoretical/experimental approach to develop dynamical models of the complex multiscale interactions that manifest as temporal and spatial heterogeneity in cancers and ultimately govern tumor response and resistance to therapy. Specifically, we examine the impact of micro-environmental modulation on cancer evolution both in silico, using a hybrid multiscale mathematical model, and in vivo, using three different spontaneous murine cancers. These models allow the tumor to be steered into a less invasive pathway through the application of small but selective biological force. Our long term goal is explicitly translational as we focus our integrated approach on an emerging cancer treatment paradigm that actively harnesses evolutionary dynamics to improve patient outcomes.

Dec
11
Mon
CBID 2017 Fall Healthcare Innovation Showcase & Shark Tank
Dec 11 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
CBID 2017 Fall Healthcare Innovation Showcase & Shark Tank @ Johns Hopkins Koch Cancer Research Building (Owens Auditorium) | Baltimore | Maryland | United States

Join the Johns Hopkins Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design for a review of many exciting healthcare design projects at the CBID Annual Fall Showcase & Shark Tank.

An alumni start-up panel will be featured this year and it’s not to be missed. The event will also include a Shark Tank competition with a panel of tough judges and real cash prizes. Light refreshments will be provided.

Click here to register.

Jan
8
Mon
Humanitarian Engineering Design Course Hackathon
Jan 8 – Jan 26 all-day

The Johns Hopkins Center for Bioengineering Innovation and Design, American University of Beirut, and the Boston University Department of Biomedical Engineering hosts the first ever join U.S.-Middle East design team hackathon.

The hackathon is focused on health needs in humanitarian settings, with students, faculty, and experts in Baltimore and Beirut.

Click here for the full schedule of events and registration information.

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