Calendar

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Feb
5
Fri
Celebrate two WSE milestones on Feb 5
Feb 5 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

From 3 to 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 5 at the Hopkins Club, the Whiting School of Engineering will celebrate two milestones:

  • Naming Ilya Shpitser as a John C. Malone Assistant Professor
  • Announcing the formation of the Whiting School of Engineering’s Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare

RSVP by February 2.

Ilya Shpitser, in the Department of Computer Science, will hold the John C. Malone Assistant Professorship, one of a series of professorships provided by John C. Malone, MS ’64, PhD ’69 to help recruit and retain faculty with the goal of improving healthcare using a systems-based approach. A data/inference specialist who focuses on inferring cause-effect relationships, Ilya will be a member of the new center. His research includes all areas of causal inference and missing data, particularly using graphical models. Recently, his work has helped distinguish between causation and association in observational medical data. Ilya started at Johns Hopkins as an assistant professor this summer, received his PhD under the supervision of Judea Pearl at UCLA, was a postdoctoral scholar in the program on causal inference at the School of Public Health at Harvard, and was a lecturer in statistics at the University of Southampton.
The Malone Center for Engineering in Healthcare, under the leadership of Greg Hager, the Mandell Bellmore Professor in the Department of Computer Science, is a multidisciplinary research initiative that will foster partnerships among engineers, clinicians, and scientists across Johns Hopkins University to catalyze, develop, and deploy innovations aimed at improving the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare.

John Malone has been remarkably generous in his support of Johns Hopkins, including a gift for the construction and naming of Malone Hall. The building, which opened in 2014, is designed to advance cutting-edge collaborative and translational research and has set a new standard for academic research facilities at Johns Hopkins. The Whiting School is grateful for Dr. Malone’s continued support of professorships and the naming of this new center in the Whiting School of Engineering.

Mar
7
Mon
Nicholas P. Jones portrait unveiling
Mar 7 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

The unveiling of the portrait of Nicholas P. Jones, who served as dean of the Whiting School of Engineering from 2004 through 2013, will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. on Monday, March 7 in the Harold Taylor Auditorium in Maryland Hall on the Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus.

Nick-Jones3820The event will include remarks by Ed Schlesinger, Benjamin T. Rome Dean of the Whiting School of Engineering, and Nicholas P. Jones, executive vice president and provost at Penn State University. A reception will follow.

RSVP by Monday, Feb. 22.

Sep
15
Thu
WSE Picnic 2016
Sep 15 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
WSE Picnic 2016 @ Wyman Quad

Join us on Thursday, September 15 for food, fun, and a featured performance by the Stone Hill All-Stars! We’ll be on the Wyman Quad–rain or shine–from noon to 2 p.m.

All Whiting School faculty, staff, post-docs, and students are invited to attend!

Tickets will become available on August 29, 2016.

Apr
4
Tue
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents “Steering Cancer Evolution: Harnessing Phenotypic Heterogeneity to Design Better Therapies”
Apr 4 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents "Steering Cancer Evolution: Harnessing Phenotypic Heterogeneity to Design Better Therapies" @ 110 Clark Hall, Johns Hopkins Homewood campus

Alexander, R.A. Anderson, the co-director of Integrated Mathematical Oncology and senior member of the Moffitt Cancer Center, will present on April 4, 2017, as part of the Institute for Computational Medicine’s Distinguished Seminar Series. The title of his presentation is “Steering Cancer Evolution: Harnessing Phenotypic Heterogeneity to Design Better Therapies.”

The seminar begins at 11 a.m. in Clark Hall 110 on the Homewood campus, and it will be video-teleconferenced to Traylor 709 on the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine campus. Click here to view webcast. Lunch will provided to those in attendance on the Homewood campus.

 

Abstract: Heterogeneity in cancer is an observed fact, both genetically and phenotypically. Cell-to-cell variation is seen in all aspects of cancer, from early development to invasion and subsequent metastasis. This heterogeneity is also at the heart of why many cancer treatments fail, as it facilitates the emergence of drug resistance. The complex spatial and temporal process by which tumors initiate, grow and evolve is a major focus of the oncology community and one that requires the integration of multiple disciplines. Tumor heterogeneity at the tissue scale is largely due to ecological variations in 
terms of the tumor habitat driven by spatially heterogeneous vascularity, which is
readily observed on cross sectional imaging. Molecular techniques have 
historically averaged genomic signals from large numbers of cells obtained in a 
single biopsy site, thus smoothing and potentially hiding underlying spatial 
variations. The complex dialogue between tumor cells and
 environment that produces intra- and inter-tumoral heterogeneity is
fundamentally governed by Darwinian dynamics. That is, local micro-
environmental conditions select phenotypic clones that are best adapted to
 survive and proliferate and, conversely, the phenotypic properties of the cells affect the 
environmental properties. While these complex interactions have enormous 
clinical implications because they promote resistance to therapy, the dynamics 
are impossible to fully capture via experimentation alone.

Here we present an integrated theoretical/experimental approach to develop dynamical models of the complex multiscale interactions that manifest as temporal and spatial heterogeneity in cancers and ultimately govern tumor response and resistance to therapy. Specifically, we examine the impact of micro-environmental modulation on cancer evolution both in silico, using a hybrid multiscale mathematical model, and in vivo, using three different spontaneous murine cancers. These models allow the tumor to be steered into a less invasive pathway through the application of small but selective biological force. Our long term goal is explicitly translational as we focus our integrated approach on an emerging cancer treatment paradigm that actively harnesses evolutionary dynamics to improve patient outcomes.

Sep
19
Tue
WSE Picnic 2017
Sep 19 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm

NOTICE: This event has been rescheduled to September 19 due to the projected path of Hurricane Irma and an abundance of caution for the Johns Hopkins Engineering community.

Join us on Tuesday, Sept. 19, for food, fun, and a featured performance by the Stone Hill All-Stars! We’ll be on the Wyman Quad—rain or shine—from noon to 2 p.m. All Whiting School faculty, staff, post-docs, and students are invited to attend!

Tickets are free, are required for entry, and will be available online (not from your department!) from August 28 through September 8.


FAQs

 

Do I have to bring my printed ticket to the event?

No, you do not have to bring your printed ticket to the event. You can choose to print your ticket, display the ticket on your phone or mobile device, or show your Johns Hopkins ID to one of our volunteers so that they can check your name against the list of attendees.

To help the lines move faster, we recommend printing your ticket in advance or having it readily available on your phone or mobile device.

 

How many tickets can I get?

Only one ticket per person.

 

Who can attend?

All Whiting School, faculty, staff, post-docs, and students are invited to attend.

 

The event was rescheduled. Do I have to get a new ticket?

No. Those who registered prior to the September 8 deadline do not need to obtain a new ticket. Existing tickets for the 2017 picnic will be honored at event check-in.

Oct
16
Mon
2017 RISE@APL Poster and Information Session
Oct 16 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
2017 RISE@APL Poster and Information Session @ Glass Pavilion

The Research Internships in Science and Engineering (RISE@APL) program allows highly qualified undergraduate and graduate students from the Whiting School of Engineering and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences the opportunity to conduct research at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.

At this poster and information session, RISE@APL Scholars will present their research findings, while representatives from APL and Johns Hopkins Engineering will be available to answer students’ questions about the application and selection process.

Oct
10
Wed
RISE@APL Poster and Information Session 2018
Oct 10 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
RISE@APL Poster and Information Session 2018 @ Glass Pavilion

The Research Internships in Science and Engineering (RISE@APL) program allows highly qualified undergraduate and graduate students from the Whiting School of Engineering and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences the opportunity to conduct research at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.

At this poster and information session, RISE@APL Scholars will present their research findings, while representatives from APL and Johns Hopkins Engineering will be available to answer students’ questions about the application and selection process.

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