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Sep
29
Tue
Charles and Mary O’Melia Lecture in Environmental Science
Sep 29 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Kimberly Jones, professor and chair of the Department of Civil Engineering at Howard University, will deliver The Charles and Mary O’Melia Lecture in Environmental Science at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 29 in Gilman 50.

2015 O'Melia Lecture -- Kimberly Jones of Howard UniversityThe title of Jones’ lecture will be “Can Nanotechnology Solve the Water Crisis? Advances and Obstacles in the Use of Nanomaterials for Water and Wastewater Treatment.”

Jones’ research interests include developing membrane processes for environmental applications, physical-chemical processes for water and wastewater treatment, remediation of emerging contaminants, drinking water quality, and environmental technology.

Oct
18
Tue
R. Rhodes Trussell to deliver 2016 Earnest and Agnes Gloyna Distinguished Lecture in Environmental Engineering
Oct 18 @ 3:00 pm – 4:15 pm

R. Rhodes Trussell R. Rhodes Trussell, Chairman and Founder of LA-based Trussell Technologies, Inc., will deliver the 2016 Earnest and Agnes Gloyna Distinguished Lecture in Environmental Engineering from 3 to 4:15 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 18. The location of this lecture will be announced closer to the date of the event. A reception will follow. This event is hosted by the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering.

 

Apr
14
Fri
Canceled – Robert Nerem presents “Regenerative Medicine: The Hype, the Hope, and the Future”
Apr 14 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Canceled - Robert Nerem presents "Regenerative Medicine: The Hype, the Hope, and the Future" @ 26 Mudd Hall

This event has been canceled.

Robert M. Nerem (Georgia Institute of Technology) presents “Regenerative Medicine: The Hype, the Hope, and the Future” as part of a special seminar hosted by the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, and the Translational Tissue Engineering Center.

Abstract: Although the underlying concepts of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine go back more than 75 years, the term tissue engineering actually was only “coined” in the 1980s. This was followed by the 1990s being the “go-go” years with stem cells emerging as a technology, an industry developing, and the term regenerative medicine beginning to be used. There also was a lot of hype, and following the turn of the century the field entered what might be called the “sobering” years, with private sector activity falling significantly even though the science continued to advance. The last decade, however, has all the marks of being “back to the future.” Advances in cell-based therapies have been fueled by advances in stem cell science and technology and the discovery of what is required to reprogram somatic cells into stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. For cellular therapies, a key question is what is the mechanism of action? For a specific therapy, is the mechanism one of cell replacement or is it a paracrine effect? If the latter, is it possible that one could introduce the appropriate biological signals without the use of cells? In this case the discussion shifts from “my cell is better than your cell” to “my biological signals are better than yours.” Whatever the case, one of the “holy grails” is the neurodegenerative diseases/disorders and the repair/regeneration of the central nervous system. Instead of the mixture of hype and hope in the past, and with an aging population providing the threat of a “tsunami” of neural disorders, regenerative medicine offers the real possibility of cures to these diseases/disorders in the future.

May
3
Thu
The 35th Annual Alexander Graham Christie Lecture
May 3 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
The 35th Annual Alexander Graham Christie Lecture @ 210 Hodson Hall

Heidi Nepf, the Donald and Martha Harleman Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will deliver the 35th Annual Alexander Graham Christie Lecture.

The lecture will be held at 3 p.m. on Thursday, May 3, in 210 Hodson Hall.

 

How vegetation alters waves and current, and the feedbacks to environmental system function

Vegetation provides a wide range of ecosystem services valued at over 4 trillion dollars per year. Seagrasses, salt marshes, and mangroves, damp storm surge and waves, mitigate anthropogenic nutrient loads, and provide important habitat and blue carbon reservoirs. The conservation and restoration of these landscapes has become the center-point of nature-based solutions for coastal protection and carbon mitigation. This seminar will summarize basic concepts in vegetation hydrodynamics, focusing on flexible meadows of seagrass, for which the bending of plants in response to fluid motion (called reconfiguration) plays an important role in setting the drag. Scaling laws are developed to describe the damping of currents, turbulence and waves as a function of plant morphology, flexibility, and shoot density. The feedbacks from plant-flow interaction to sediment transport and carbon sequestration are also discussed.


Sponsored by the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the JHU Student Section and the Baltimore Section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

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