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Sep
6
Tue
ICM Distinguised Seminar Series presents “Mining Big Data for Molecular Marker Detection”
Sep 6 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Photo of Su-In LeeSu-In Lee, assistant professor of computer science and engineering and genome sciences at the University of Washington, will present “Mining Big Data for Molecular Marker Detection.”

AbstractThe repertoire of drugs for patients with cancer is rapidly expanding. However, cancers that appear pathologically similar often respond differently to the same drug regimens. Methods to better match patients to specific drugs are in high demand. There is a fair amount of data on molecular profiles from patients with cancer. The most important step necessary to realize the ultimate goal is to identify molecular markers in these data that predict the response to each of hundreds of chemotherapy drugs. However, due to the high-dimensionality (i.e., the number of variables is much greater than the number of samples) along with potential biological or experimental confounders, it is an open challenge to identify robust biomarkers that are replicated across different studies.

In this talk, Lee will present two distinct machine learning techniques to resolve these challenges. These methods learn the low-dimensional features that are likely to represent important molecular events in the disease process in an unsupervised fashion, based on molecular profiles from multiple populations of patients with specific cancer types. Lee will present two applications of these two methods: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and ovarian cancer. When the first method was applied to AML data in collaboration with UW Hematology and UW’s Center for Cancer Innovation, a novel molecular marker for topoisomerase inhibitors, widely used chemotherapy drugs in AML treatment, was revealed. The other method applied to ovarian cancer data led to a potential molecular driver for tumor-associated stroma, in collaboration with UW Pathology and UW Genome Sciences. These methods are general computational frameworks and can be applied to many other diseases.

For those who cannot make it to the Homewood campus, the seminar will be video-conferenced to Traylor 709 on the School of Medicine campus.

For those who attend at Homewood, lunch will be provided at noon.

May
4
Fri
12th Annual Nano-Bio Symposium
May 4 all-day

The annual Nano-Bio Symposium is INBT’s signature event to showcase our multidisciplinary programs and researchers from across the entire University. The event provides an opportunity to hear presentations by leading scholars in the field, both from Hopkins and other institutions. It also offers a unique opportunity to meet and network with faculty and experts to establish new collaborations.

The annual symposium is hosted by INBT and the Physical Science-Oncology Center. This years theme will be Advanced Biomanufacuring and take place at the Homewood campus in the Glass Pavilion.

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May
3
Fri
13th Annual Nano-Bio Symposium
May 3 all-day

The Annual Nano-Bio Symposium is a showcase and celebration of the latest discoveries in nanoscience from our multidisciplinary research teams at the Institute for NanoBioTechnology. It brings students and top scholars from Hopkins, other institutions, and industry together to network, share knowledge and ideas, and foster new collaborations.

The theme for the 2019 Nano-Bio Symposium is Translation of Nano & Bio Research.

Visit inbt.jhu.edu/symposium for more information.

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