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Oct
4
Tue
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents “Taking (Small) Models to the Point of Care”
Oct 4 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents "Taking (Small) Models to the Point of Care" @ 110 Clark Hall, VTC to 709 Traylor

Thomas Heldt, assistant professor of electrical and biomedical engineering at MIT, will present “Taking (Small) Models to the Point of Care.”

Abstract: Large volumes of heterogeneous data are now routinely collected and archived from patients in a variety of clinical environments, to support real-time decision-making, monitoring of disease progression, and titration of therapy. This rapid expansion of available physiological data has resulted in a data-rich – but often knowledge-poor – environment. Yet the abundance of clinical data also presents an opportunity to systematically fuse and analyze the available data streams, through appropriately chosen mathematical models, and to provide clinicians with insights that may not be readily extracted from visual review of the available data streams.

In this talk, I will highlight our work in model-based signal processing to derive additional and clinically useful information from routinely available data streams. In the first part of the talk, I will present our model-based approach to noninvasive, patient-specific and calibration free estimation of intracranial pressure, and will elaborate on the challenges of collecting high-quality clinical data for validation. In the second part of the talk, I will present our work on extracting clinically meaningful and actionable information from the shape of the capnogram, with applications to differentiating respiratory and cardiac causes of shortness of breath.

For those who cannot make it to the Homewood campus, the seminar will be video-conferenced to Traylor 709 on the School of Medicine campus.

For those who attend at Homewood, lunch will be provided at noon.

Nov
1
Tue
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents “Change Point Estimation of Brain Shape Data in Relation with Alzheimer’s Disease”
Nov 1 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents "Change Point Estimation of Brain Shape Data in Relation with Alzheimer's Disease" @ Clark Hall 110, VTC to Traylor 709

Laurent Younes, professor and chair of the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at Johns Hopkins University, will present “Change Point Estimation of Brain Shape Data in Relation with Alzheimer’s Disease.”

Abstract: The manifestation of an event, such as the onset of a disease, is not always immediate and often requires some time for its repercussions to become observable. Slowly progressing diseases, and in particular neuro-degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), fall into this category. The manifestation of such diseases is related to the onset of cognitive or functional impairment and, at the time when this occurs, the disease may have already had been affecting the brain anatomically and functionally for a considerable time. We consider a statistical two-phase regression model in which the change point of a disease biomarker is measured relative to another point in time, such as the manifestation of the disease, which is subject to right-censoring (i.e., possibly unobserved over the entire course of the study). We develop point estimation methods for this model, based on maximum likelihood, and bootstrap validation methods. The effectiveness of our approach is illustrated by numerical simulations, and by the estimation of a change point for atrophy in the context of Alzheimer’s disease, wherein it is related to the cognitive manifestation of the disease. This work is a collaboration with Marilyn Albert, Xiaoying Tang and Michael Miller, and was partially supported by the NIH.

For those who cannot make it to the Homewood campus, the seminar will be video-conferenced to Traylor 709 on the School of Medicine campus.

For those who attend at Homewood, lunch will be provided at noon.

Feb
6
Mon
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents “The Role of Quantitative Pharmacology in Drug Development”
Feb 6 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

“The Role of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development”

Don Stanski joined AstraZeneca in early 2014 as Global Head of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology. He received his MD from the University of Calgary and his clinical anesthesiology residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, followed by research training in clinical pharmacology/ pharmacometrics from the late Lewis B. Sheiner at the University of California, San Francisco. He joined Stanford University in 1979 developing a clinical pharmacology and pharmacometric academic research program for anesthetic/analgesic drugs. In 1992 he became Chairman of the Department of Anesthesia. He retired emeritus from Stanford in 2005. He spent two years as a senior scientific advisor at the FDA then joined Novartis. He built an integrated Modeling and Simulation program at Novartis over the next eight years, prior to joining AstraZeneca. Don works out of AstraZeneca’s Gaithersburg, MD site.

 

 

 

Dave Boulton joined AstraZeneca in early 2015. He is the Late-Phase Metabolics Franchise Lead for Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology where he is accountable for anti-diabetic and anti-hyperkalemic medicines. He received his BPharm and PhD from the University of Otago, New Zealand, with an internship between his degrees qualifying him as a licensed Pharmacist. This was followed by 4 years of postdoctoral training at the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. Dave then joined Bristol-Myers Squibb where for 14 years he worked as an individual contributor and later in leadership roles as a Clinical Pharmacologist in a number of therapeutic areas and in all phases of drug development. Dave works out of AstraZeneca’s Gaithersburg, MD site.

Click here to view webcast.

 

“The Role of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development”

Dr. Stanski will discuss the integration and quantitative modelling of data and disease information over the research and development spectrum to generate knowledge that informs clinical drug development and underpins business decisions which is the core mission of the Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology (QCP) Department at AstraZeneca (AZ). This framework ensures the right patient gets the right dose at the right time with optimized trial designs and clearly identified proof of mechanisms. The organizational structure and role of the QCP in the drug development process at AstraZeneca will be outlined. The role of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacology scientists in the R&D process will be discussed. Dr. Boulton will provide an example of integrated model-based approaches to answering key clinical questions for AZ’s sodium-glucose linked co-transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor, dapagliflozin, which is approved for type 2 diabetes mellitus but is now being proposed as a new treatment for heart failure and chronic kidney disease. The QCP-driven modeling approach uses quantitative systems pharmacology, longitudinal pharmacometric, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic, and model-based meta-analysis approaches to provide the organization with a scientific basis on which to invest in these potential new indications without having to conduct expensive and time-consuming Phase 2b studies.

Click here to view webcast.

Apr
6
Thu
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents “Using Modeling to Inform Critical Decisions: Three Stories of Preclinical Molecules”
Apr 6 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
ICM Distinguished Seminar Series presents "Using Modeling to Inform Critical Decisions: Three Stories of Preclinical Molecules" @ 107 Latrobe Hall

Yasmin Hashambhoy-Ramsay will present “Using Modeling to Inform Critical Decisions: Three Stories of Preclinical Molecules” on April 6 in a presentation hosted by the Institute for Computational Medicine.

Bio: Yasmin Hashambhoy-Ramsay is a computational biologist working in the biotech industry in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She was born and raised in Toronto and obtained her undergraduate degree in Applied Mathematics and Engineering at Queen’s University. A strong desire to help patients drew her to Johns Hopkins, and she is a proud alumna of the BME PhD program. She graduated from Rai Winslow’s lab and worked as a postdoctoral fellow with Feilim Mac Gabhann. As a Principal Scientist at Merrimack Pharmaceuticals, she used modeling to help advance drug development on various antibody and nanotherapeutic preclinical teams. She looks forward to starting a new position at Jounce Therapeutics in April as a Senior Bioinformatics Scientist.

Abstract: When I was a graduate student and postdoc at Johns Hopkins, I loved doing biomedical research. The thought of taking rational, engineering approaches to understand biological mechanisms really appealed to me; however, I wasn’t sure if folks in industry appreciated these approaches too. It turns out that they do, and lots of pharmaceutical companies use computational biology to inform critical decisions. Over the past five years, I have worked on a number of preclinical teams at Merrimack Pharmaceuticals. In this talk, I will share three stories describing how I used different modeling approaches to answer critical questions that helped advance the development of early stage oncology drugs.

Jun
27
Tue
INBT Summer Seminar Series: Vipul Periwal
Jun 27 @ 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm

The Institute for NanoBioTechnology Seminar Series will present Vipul Periwal from the National Institutes of Health and his discussion on “Quantitatively predicting the effects of therapeutic intervention in human disease.”

Periwal is a senior investigator at the National Institutes of Health in the Intramural Research Program. His focus is on computational medicine and biological modeling with a goal to use biological modeling to predict systemic responses to perturbations. His current research includes data-driven large-scale biological modeling of disease, model of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria, and adipocyte development and insulin resistance.

Light refreshments will be provided.

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