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Nov
8
Tue
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series presents “Computer Architecture 1975-2025”
Nov 8 @ 10:30 am – 11:45 am
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series presents "Computer Architecture 1975-2025" @ B-17 Hackerman Hall

Mark D. Hill, University of Wisconsin-Madison, will present “Computer Architecture 1975-2025” as part of the Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series. The seminar begins at 10:45 a.m. in Room B-17, Hackerman Hall, on Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

The seminar and lecture series is hosted by the Johns Hopkins Department of Computer Science, and was established in recognition of the department’s 30th anniversary. The series is named for the department’s founding chair, Gerald M. Masson, whose tenacity and visionary leadership paved the way for the department’s current success and prominence.

  • This talk will explain how computer architects contribute to information technology that is transforming the world. It will present computer architecture basics and trends since the first microprocessor in the mid-1970s. It will then discuss how present challenges to Moore’s Law will open up new directions for computer systems, including architecture as infrastructure, energy first, impact of emerging technologies, and cross-layer opportunities. Reference: CCC “21st Century Computer Architecture.”

  • Mark D. Hill is John P. Morgridge Professor, Gene M. Amdahl Professor of Computer Sciences, and Computer Sciences Department Chair at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Professor Hill is a senior computer architect interested in parallel-computer system design, memory system design, and computer simulation. He developed the 3C cache miss taxonomy (compulsory, capacity, and conflict) and co-developed “sequential consistency for data-race free” that serves as a foundation of the C++ and Java memory models. He is a fellow of IEEE and the ACM, co-inventor on 35 patents, and taught more than 1000 students with 40 Ph.D. progeny so far. Hill has a PhD in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley and currently serves as Vice Chair of the Computer Community Consortium.

Nov
17
Thu
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series presents “An Expanding and Expansive View of Computing”
Nov 17 @ 10:30 am – 11:45 am
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series presents "An Expanding and Expansive View of Computing" @ B-17 Hackerman Hall

Jim Kurose, National Science Foundation, will present “An Expanding and Expansive View of Computing” as part of the Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series. The seminar begins at 10:30 a.m. in Room B-17, Hackerman Hall, on Thursday, November 17, 2016.

The seminar and lecture series is hosted by the Johns Hopkins Department of Computer Science, and was established in recognition of the department’s 30th anniversary. The series is named for the department’s founding chair, Gerald M. Masson, whose tenacity and visionary leadership paved the way for the department’s current success and prominence.

  • Advances in computer and information science and engineering are providing unprecedented opportunities for research and education. My talk will begin with an overview of CISE activities and programs at the National Science Foundation and include a discussion of current trends that are shaping the future of our discipline. I will also discuss the opportunities as well as the challenges that lay ahead for our community and for CISE.

  • Jim Kurose is an Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF), where he leads the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE). With an annual budget of more than $900 million, CISE’s mission is to uphold the nation’s leadership in scientific discovery and engineering innovation through its support of fundamental research in computer and information science and engineering and transformative advances in cyber infrastructure. Kurose is on leave from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where he is a Distinguished Professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences.

    His research interests include network protocols and architecture, network measurement, sensor networks, multimedia communication, and modeling and performance evaluation. He has received a number of awards for his research and teaching, including several conference best paper awards, the IEEE Infocom Achievement Award, the ACM Sigcomm Lifetime Achievement Award, the ACM Sigcomm Test of Time Award, several outstanding teacher awards, and the IEEE/CS Taylor Booth Education Medal. With Keith Ross, he is the co-author of the textbook, Computer Networking, a top down approach (7th edition).

    Kurose received his PhD in computer science from Columbia University and a BA degree in physics from Wesleyan University. He is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE).

Mar
7
Tue
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series presents “Interactive Visual Discovery in Event Analytics: Electronic Health Records and Other Applications”
Mar 7 @ 10:30 am – 11:45 am
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series presents "Interactive Visual Discovery in Event Analytics: Electronic Health Records and Other Applications" @ B-17 Hackerman Hall

Ben Shneiderman, University of Maryland-College Park, will present “Interactive Visual Discovery in Event Analytics: Electronic Health Records and Other Applications” as part of the Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series. The seminar begins at 10:30 a.m. in Room B-17, Hackerman Hall, on Tuesday, March 7, 2017.

The seminar and lecture series is hosted by the Johns Hopkins Department of Computer Science, and was established in recognition of the department’s 30th anniversary. The series is named for the department’s founding chair, Gerald M. Masson, whose tenacity and visionary leadership paved the way for the department’s current success and prominence.

  • Event Analytics is rapidly emerging as a new topic to extract insights from the growing set of temporal event sequences that come from medical histories, e-commerce patterns, social media log analysis, cybersecurity threats, sensor nets, online education, sports, etc. This talk reviews our decade of research on visualizing and exploring temporal event sequences to view compact summaries of thousands of patient histories represented as time-stamped events, such as strokes, vaccinations or admission to an emergency room. Our current work on EventFlow supports point events, such as heart attacks or vaccinations and interval events such as medication episodes or long hospitalizations. Demonstrations cover visual interfaces to support hospital quality control analysts who ensure that required procedures were carried out and clinical researchers who study treatment patterns that lead to successful outcomes. I show how domain-specific knowledge and problem-specific insights can lead to sharpening the analytic focus so as to enable more successful pattern and anomaly detection.

  • Ben Shneiderman is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Computer Science, Founding Director (1983-2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, and a Member of the UM Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS) at the University of Maryland.  He is a Fellow of the AAAS, ACM, IEEE, and NAI, and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, in recognition of his pioneering contributions to human-computer interaction and information visualization. His contributions include the direct manipulation concept, clickable highlighted web-links, touchscreen keyboards, dynamic query sliders for Spotfire, development of treemaps, novel network visualizations for NodeXL, and temporal event sequence analysis for electronic health records.

    Ben is the co-author with Catherine Plaisant of Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (6th ed., 2016) http://www.awl.com/DTUI/.  With Stu Card and Jock Mackinlay, he co-authored Readings in Information Visualization: Using Vision to Think (1999).  His book Leonardo’s Laptop (MIT Press) won the IEEE book award for Distinguished Literary Contribution.  He co-authored, Analyzing Social Media Networks with NodeXL (2010) with Derek Hansen and Marc Smith.  Shneiderman’s latest book is The New ABCs of Research: Achieving Breakthrough Collaborations (Oxford, April 2016.)

Apr
11
Tue
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series presents “Development of Kinematic and Dynamic Models for Individual Using System Estimation and Identification Techniques”
Apr 11 @ 10:30 am – 11:45 am
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series presents "Development of Kinematic and Dynamic Models for Individual Using System Estimation and Identification Techniques" @ B-17 Hackerman Hall

Ruzena Bajcsy, University of California-Berkeley, will present “Development of Kinematic and Dynamic Models for Individual Using Systems Estimation and Identification Techniques” as part of the Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series. The seminar begins at 10:30 a.m. in Room B-17, Hackerman Hall.

The seminar and lecture series is hosted by the Johns Hopkins Department of Computer Science, and was established in recognition of the department’s 30th anniversary. The series is named for the department’s founding chair, Gerald M. Masson, whose tenacity and visionary leadership paved the way for the department’s current success and prominence.

  • This talk will introduce a kinematic and dynamic framework for creating a representative model of an individual. Building on results from geometric robotics, a method for formulating a geometric dynamic identification model is derived. This method is validated on a robotic arm, and tested on healthy and muscular dystrophy subjects to determine the utility as a clinical tool. In order to capture kinematics of the human body we used Visual observations, either motion capture or the Kinect camera. In order to obtain the dynamical parameters of the individual, we used force plate and force sensors for robot attached to human hand. The work in progress is to use Ultrasound scanner and Acoustic myography in order to estimate the muscle strength. Our current representative kinematic and dynamic model outperformed conventional height/mass scaled models. This allows us for rapid, quantitative measurements of an individual, with minimal retraining required for clinicians. These tools are then used to develop a prescriptive model for developing assistive devices. This framework is then used to develop a novel system for human assistance. A prototype device is developed and tested. The prototype is lightweight, uses minimal energy, and can provide an augmentation of 82% for providing hammer curl assistance.

  • Ruzena Bajcsy received master’s and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from Slovak Technical University, Bratislava, Slovak Republic, in 1957 and 1967, respectively, and a PhD in computer science from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, in 1972. She is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley, and Director Emeritus of the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Science (CITRIS). Prior to joining Berkeley, she headed the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate at the National Science Foundation. Bajcsy is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Science Institute of Medicine as well as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the American Association for Artificial Intelligence.

Oct
5
Thu
Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture: “Why Data Citation is a Computational Problem”
Oct 5 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

The Johns Hopkins Department of Computer Science will host Susan B. Davidson, the Weiss Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, as part of the Gerald M. Masson Distinguished Lecture Series.

 

Abstract

“Why Data Citation is a Computational Problem”

Most information is now published in complex, structured, evolving datasets or databases. As such, there is increasing demand that this digital information should be treated in the same way as conventional publications and cited appropriately. While principles and standards have been developed for data citation, they are unlikely to be used unless we can couple the process of extracting information with that of providing a citation for it. In this talk, Davidson will discuss the problem of automatically generating citations for data in a database given how the data was obtained (the query) as well as the content (the data), and show how the problem of generating a citation is related to two well-studied problems in databases: query rewriting using views and provenance.

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