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To view more alumni events, click here.

Apr
8
Wed
E2SHI’s Annual Symposium: Innovations in Managing Climate Risk
Apr 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

The Johns Hopkins Environment, Energy, Sustainability & Health Institute (E²SHI) invites you to an interactive session led by Pablo Suarez from the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre on climate change and disaster response, and to explore how to bridge science, policy and practice. The title of the presentation is “Innovations in Managing Climate Risk: Reimagining humanitarian and development work.”

Pablo SuarezA light lunch will be served starting at 11:45 am, and Michael Klag, Dean of the Bloomberg School of Public Health, will give opening remarks.

The symposium is free and open to all Johns Hopkins faculty, staff and students, as well as community members.

RSVP by April 5 to attend.

Details here.

Apr
6
Wed
HEMI’s MACH 2016 Conference
Apr 6 @ 8:00 am – Apr 8 @ 1:30 pm

machlogo2016Presented by the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute, the Mach Conference showcases the state of the art of multiscale research in materials, with an emphasis on advancing the fundamental science and engineering of materials and structures in extreme environments. Details and registration here.

Oct
31
Mon
Dedication of the John C. Malone Professorship and installation of John W. Krakauer
Oct 31 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

This event dedicates the John C. Malone Professorship and installs John W. Krakauer, professor of neurology and neuroscience and director of the Center for the Study of Motor Learning and Brain Repair at Johns Hopkins Medicine. Reception to follow.

Registration is required to attend. RSVP by Monday, Oct. 17 by calling 443-287-7876 or by emailing neurodev@jhmi.edu.

  • Parking is available in the Orleans Street Garage

    1795 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21231

    From Washington, D.C., Virginia and I-95 Access at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport:

    • Take I-95 North to Exit 53 (I-395 North) into downtown Baltimore (Note: Do not take the Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. fork of the exit.)
    • Turn right at Pratt Street (by the Baltimore Convention Center).
    • Continue on Pratt Street and turn left onto Broadway.
    • Turn right on Orleans Street.
    • Make a right into the Orleans Street Garage.

    From Philadelphia, New York and Northeastern Baltimore Suburbs:

    • Take I-95 South toward Baltimore to Exit 57 (Boston Street and O’ Donnell Street).
    • Proceed on Boston Street approximately 2 miles and turn left onto Fleet Street.
    • Continue on Fleet Street and turn right onto Broadway.
    • Turn left onto Orleans Street.
    • Make a right into the Orleans Street Garage.

    From York, Central Pennsylvania and Northern Baltimore Suburbs:

    • Take I-83 South into Baltimore. 
    • I-83 ends at Fayette Street (traffic light), which becomes President Street. 
    • Make the immediate left on Fayette Street. 
    • Follow Fayette Street to Broadway and turn left. 
    • Turn right on Orleans Street. 
    • Make a right into the Orleans Street Garage.

    From Annapolis and Maryland’s Eastern Shore:

    • From Route 50, take I-97 toward Baltimore and follow I-97 to the Baltimore Beltway (I-695) toward Towson.
    • Take the beltway to the Baltimore-Washington Parkway (I-295) into Baltimore (becomes Russell Street).
    • Turn right at Pratt Street.
    • Continue on Pratt Street and turn left onto Broadway.
    • Turn right on Orleans Street.
    • Make a right into the Orleans Street Garage.

Dec
2
Fri
HEMI Seminar: Jay Gould
Dec 2 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Jay Gould, professor of photography at Maryland Institute College of Art and HEMI’s 2016 Artist in Residence, will present a variety of new projects that depict and react to the research being done at HEMI in preparation for an exhibition at the MSE Library in April, 2017.

Using a wide range of media and processes, this work reimagines HEMI’s research using playful analogies, unique narratives and unexpected lab documentation, inviting audiences to admire the depth and fascination that extreme materials represent.

About

Photo of Jay GouldGould received his BFA from the University of Wisconsin and his MFA in photography from the Savannah College of Art and Design. His work, which integrates scientific topics into installation, and constructed photographic projects, is widely exhibited and has won numerous national awards, such as the Berenice Abbott Prize and the Magenta Foundation’s Flash Forward Festival.

2016 HEMI and MICA Extreme Arts Program Open House
Dec 2 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
2016 HEMI and MICA Extreme Arts Program Open House @ Malone G33/35

The Extreme Arts Open House provides an opportunity for representatives from HEMI and Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) faculty and students to learn about each other’s research interests and explore potential synergies for either the Artist in Residence program or the Summer Project/Internship.

The event is free. Researchers from HEMI will be onsite and available to discuss their interests in possible collaboration within, but not limited to, the following areas:

  • Data visualization
  • Interpretation, translation, and/or effective communication of large amounts of data
  • Response to research regarding HEMI ‘extreme’ events, collaborations, interdependent systems through:
    • Storyboarding and narrative
    • Animation
    • Photography
    • Graphic Design and graphics
    • Interactive arts or products
    • Games
    • Information visualization
    • Illustration
    • Drawing
    • Painting
    • Sculptural forms or materials

To view a list of potential HEMI researchers, click here.

If you have any questions regarding the event, please contact Ms. Bess Bieluczyk, bess@jhu.edu or (410) 516-7794.

Information for attendees:

If you are traveling by car, visitor parking is available in the South Garage. If you are using a GPS system for directions, the best address to use in 3101 Wyman Park Drive.

Malone Hall (#45 on the map) is located between Mason Hall and Hackerman Hall on the Johns Hopkins University campus.

Nov
6
Tue
2018 Charles and Mary O’Melia Lecture in Environmental Science
Nov 6 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Re-Envisioning Wastewater Treatment for the 21st Century

Desmond LawlerDesmond Lawler, PhD
Nassir I. Al-Rashid Chair in Civil Engineering
Professor
Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering
The University of Texas at Austin

Abstract: The philosophy of municipal wastewater treatment has changed only slowly in the past 100 years. From approximately 1920 to 1970, a wastewater discharge was considered acceptable if the dissolved oxygen level in the receiving stream did not dip below 5 mg/L downstream of the discharge. Protecting aquatic life, particularly fish, from immediate death due to low oxygen levels was the primary motivation and the goal. The passage of the Clean Water Act in 1970 reflected a broader view to include concerns about eutrophication by nutrients and ecological and human health concerns with the naming of “priority pollutants.” Nevertheless, the central concept was that discharge concentrations would be acceptable if they took advantage of the assimilative capacity of receiving waters; that is, if they limited the harm to acceptable values. Now we are embarking on a new philosophy, captured by the phrase “One Water” by the Water Environment Federation, in which we think of wastewater not as a problem for disposal but as a resource.

Why is this shift in philosophy happening? At least two major changes have occurred since the old philosophies were developed. First, a dramatically increased population has led to a substantial increase in “indirect potable reuse” of wastewater, whereby the effluent discharge from one city is a part of the drinking water source for a downstream city. In many areas of the arid Southwest, that “part” can often be nearly 100%. An extension of this trend, due to water shortages, is the drive toward direct potable reuse of wastewater. Second, not only do the chemical and pharmaceutical industries now produce tens of thousands of synthetic chemicals that were not dreamed of when the “priority pollutant” list associated with the Clean Water Act was developed, we now understand that some of these products are endocrine disruptors and others lead to microbial antibiotic resistance.

In this talk, I will try to make the case that wastewater treatment needs to be changed, perhaps radically, to reflect the new philosophy and to meet the needs of the 21st century. The thrust of the presentation will be to explore some possibilities for these radical changes and try to back them up with preliminary engineering calculations.

Sep
27
Fri
HEMI Extreme Arts Exhibit: Symmetry & Fracture (Works by Jenna Frye)
Sep 27 2019 @ 4:30 pm – Jan 10 2020 @ 4:30 pm
HEMI Extreme Arts Exhibit: Symmetry & Fracture (Works by Jenna Frye) @ Milton S. Eisenhower Library, Q Level

HEMI research asks fascinating questions about what happens to materials under extreme conditions. Much of HEMI’s research can’t be perceived without powerful scanning technologies, let alone touched. Touch and perception, however, are both essential to how artists and designers learn and understand the world.

Symmetry and Fracture offers a way to physically connect with the complex research ideas of HEMI labs through hands-on exploration of mineral crystal systems and the grain boundaries of metallic materials.

You are invited to playfully investigate and decide for yourself where or if boundaries lie between art and science.

Opening Reception: Symmetry & Fracture (Works by Jenna Frye)
Sep 27 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Opening Reception: Symmetry & Fracture (Works by Jenna Frye) @ Milton S. Eisenhower Library, Q Level

HEMI research asks fascinating questions about what happens to materials under extreme conditions. Much of HEMI’s research can’t be perceived without powerful scanning technologies, let alone touched. Touch and perception, however, are both essential to how artists and designers learn and understand the world.

Symmetry and Fracture offers a way to physically connect with the complex research ideas of HEMI labs through hands-on exploration of mineral crystal systems and the grain boundaries of metallic materials.

You are invited to playfully investigate and decide for yourself where or if boundaries lie between art and science.

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