In This Issue

At WSE View All

In Memoriam: Remembering Murray Sachs

Sachs’ research on how the brain receives and processes sound paved the way for the development of cochlear implants, electronic devices that deliver a sense of sound to people with hearing loss.

Fun With ‘Robo-Bugs’

One robot that can retrieve objects drifting into deep water using a whirligig beetle’s swimming ability. Another that can deliver letters and greeting cards with the speed and grace of a dragonfly. Both were among the “Robo-Bugs” imagined and designed by third graders at Barclay Elementary/Middle School last fall.

Two Elected to National Academy of Engineering

Jennifer Elisseeff, professor of biomedical engineering, and Charles Meneveau, professor of mechanical engineering, were among 83 new members, along with 16 foreign members, elected into the 2018 class.

Impact View All

Upstarts: A New Way to See

Johns Hopkins engineers are developing a new kind of camera to help self-driving vehicles better detect obstacles and surrounding traffic and prevent accidents.

Tech Tools: Getting Under Your Skin

Stand in front of this “magic mirror,” and it seems to peer beneath your skin, revealing bones, major organs, blood vessels, and muscles.

Students View All

A Hackathon with Humanitarian Aims

At the first-ever virtual Humanitarian Design Hackathon at Johns Hopkins, student groups have been tasked with generating a solution to a problem or need faced mainly by Syrian refugees in Lebanon.

Asteroid Architecture

Knowing whether an asteroid is a giant hunk of rock or a floating gravel pile—or a mix of the two—will make a big difference in strategies that researchers might devise to prevent one from striking Earth or to drill inside.

Go Figure

In a class fondly known as Senior Lab, chemical and biomolecular engineering students begin to transform from passive receivers of knowledge into engineers who troubleshoot equipment quirks and adjust experiments on the fly.

Alumni View All

The New World of ‘Superfans’

In “Superfandom,” Zoe Fraade-Blanar and Aaron Glazer describe a symbiotic world where brand owners and brand consumers have converged —a world in which a new class of “superfans” have more clout than ever to shape the brands they love.

Toward More Adaptable Cellphones

Cellphones that seamlessly work on any network would make lives easier for international travelers. Alyssa Apsel, PhD ’03, is designing inexpensive, flexible radio systems to help make that possible.

Back Talk View All

Start Preparing for the Next Hurricane Irma

It’s time to stop using the words “unprecedented” or “one in a pick-your-large-number-year flood” to fool ourselves into believing that we’re experiencing one-off weather that can’t be defended against.

From The Dean

From the Dean

The pace of change here is almost dizzying. In the last year alone, the Whiting School’s footprint on Homewood campus—and slightly beyond—has increased by 20 percent, allowing us to expand our critical core research facilities and world-class laboratories, and add more space for centers and institutes.