In This Issue

At WSE View All

Two Elected to National Academy of Engineering

Jennifer Elisseeff, professor of biomedical engineering, and Charles Meneveau, professor of mechanical engineering, were among 83 new members, along with 16 foreign members, elected into the 2018 class.

In Memoriam: Remembering Murray Sachs

Sachs’ research on how the brain receives and processes sound paved the way for the development of cochlear implants, electronic devices that deliver a sense of sound to people with hearing loss.

Impact View All

C-Arms Bring 3-D to the OR

Jeff Siewerdsen and his team are advancing imaging technologies that will make surgery more precise and improve patient safety.

Of Paper and Permeability

For decades, preservationists have helped protect historic documents, such as centuries-old maps, by placing them in clear envelopes. Enclosing them in these clear envelopes provides mechanical support to help keep these old, brittle treasures from crumbling while also allowing the public to see and sometimes handle them. But paper degradation isn’t a self-contained event, says Patricia McGuiggan.

Averting Deadly Arrhythmias

Arrhythmias linked to sudden cardiac death are very rare, making it difficult to study how they occur—and how they might be prevented. To make it much easier to discover what triggers this deadly disorder Johns Hopkins scientists constructed a powerful new computer model that replicates the biological activity within the heart that precedes sudden cardiac death.

Students View All

Asteroid Architecture

Knowing whether an asteroid is a giant hunk of rock or a floating gravel pile—or a mix of the two—will make a big difference in strategies that researchers might devise to prevent one from striking Earth or to drill inside.

Wind Power’s Smooth Operators

Fleets of small fossil-fuel power plants typically smooth those fluctuations. But could wind farms themselves provide that service?

JHU Brand Ambassador

Clark Kent has Superman. Peter Parker has Spider-Man. And Justin Stith has Jay. The Johns Hopkins Blue Jay, that is.

Alumni View All

Toward More Adaptable Cellphones

Cellphones that seamlessly work on any network would make lives easier for international travelers. Alyssa Apsel, PhD ’03, is designing inexpensive, flexible radio systems to help make that possible.

The New World of ‘Superfans’

In “Superfandom,” Zoe Fraade-Blanar and Aaron Glazer describe a symbiotic world where brand owners and brand consumers have converged —a world in which a new class of “superfans” have more clout than ever to shape the brands they love.

Old Yet Hip

Furniture company Hugo & Hoby is finding success with its old-yet-hip guidelines—locally sourced, sustainable materials, local fabricators, durable and beautiful design, and close personal relationships with both clients and makers.

Back Talk View All

Start Preparing for the Next Hurricane Irma

It’s time to stop using the words “unprecedented” or “one in a pick-your-large-number-year flood” to fool ourselves into believing that we’re experiencing one-off weather that can’t be defended against.

From The Dean

From the Dean

The pace of change here is almost dizzying. In the last year alone, the Whiting School’s footprint on Homewood campus—and slightly beyond—has increased by 20 percent, allowing us to expand our critical core research facilities and world-class laboratories, and add more space for centers and institutes.