Research Project

Multicolored and Next-Generation Solar Cell Development Based on Hybrid Nanomaterials

Solution-processed technologies, such as semiconductor nanocrystals, offer an attractive route towards achieving these goals.

002

Figure 1 (a) Cross-sectional scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of a PbS CQD film. (b) Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of PbS CQDs. The scale bar is 10 nm. (c) Solution-phase absorption spectra for PbS CQDs. Smaller sized particles result in higher energy absorption onsets. (d) Photoluminescence spectra for different PbS CQD films.

The next generation of photovoltaics seeks to push the boundaries of both efficiency and cost-effectiveness through the use of flexible platforms and new materials. Solution-processed technologies, such as semiconductor nanocrystals, offer an attractive route towards achieving these goals. Additionally, these materials are uniquely suited to benefit from photonic and optical engineering of their structures and properties. For example, the bandgap of inorganic nanocrystal films can be tuned via the quantum confinement effect for tailored spectral utilization, and nanophotonic light trapping techniques can be seamlessly integrated into devices employing both organic and inorganic materials. This project is focused on the development of nanostructured materials, such as colloidal quantum dots and plasmonic metal nanoparticles, to build multicolored, transparent, and next-generation devices that go beyond the traditional limits imposed by bulk materials.

Back to top