Calendar

Oct
24
Thu
Special Virtual Seminar and Fireside Chat: Russ Poldrack, Stanford University @ Olin Hall 305
Oct 24 @ 3:00 pm – 4:15 pm
Special Virtual Seminar and Fireside Chat: Russ Poldrack, Stanford University @ Olin Hall 305

Note: This is a virtual seminar that will be broadcast in Olin Hall 305. Refreshments will be available outside Olin Hall 305 at 2:30 PM.

Title: Computational infrastructure to improve scientific reproducibility

Abstract: The massive increase in the dimensionality of scientific data and the proliferation of complex data analysis methods has raised increasing concerns about the reproducibility of scientific results in many domains of science. I will first present evidence that analytic flexibility in neuroimaging research is associated with surprising variability in scientific outcomes in the wild, even holding the raw data constant. These findings motivate the development of well-tested software tools for neuroimaging data processing and analysis. I will focus in particular on the role of software development tools such as containerization and continuous integration, which provide the potential to deliver automated and reproducible data analysis at scale. I will also discuss the challenging tradeoffs inherent in the usage of complex software by scientists, and the need for increased transparency and validation of scientific software.

Bio: Russell A. Poldrack is the Albert Ray Lang Professor in the Department of Psychology and Professor (by courtesy) of Computer Science at Stanford University, and Director of the Stanford Center for Reproducible Neuroscience. His research uses neuroimaging to understand the brain systems underlying decision making and executive function. His lab is also engaged in the development of neuroinformatics tools to help improve the reproducibility and transparency of neuroscience, including the Openneuro.org and Neurovault.org data sharing projects and the Cognitive Atlas ontology.

Nov
14
Thu
Distinguished Lecture Series: Reimund Gerhard, University of Potsdam @ Olin Hall 305
Nov 14 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Distinguished Lecture Series: Reimund Gerhard, University of Potsdam @ Olin Hall 305

Title: Electrets (Dielectrics with quasi-permanent Charges or Dipoles) – A long history and a bright future

Abstract: The history of electrets can be traced back to Thales of Miletus (approx. 624-546 B.C.E.) who reported that pieces of amber (“electron”) attract or repel each other. The science of fundamental electrical phenomena is closely intertwined with the development of electrets which came under such terms as “electrics”, “electrophores”, “charged/poled dielectrics”, etc. until about one century ago. Modern electret research started with Oliver Heaviside (1850-1925), who defined the concept of a “permanently electrized body” and proposed the name “electret” in 1885, and Mototarô Eguchi, who experimentally investigated carnauba wax electrets at the Higher Naval College in Tokyo around 1920. Today, we see a wide range of electret types, electret materials, and electret applications, which are being investigated and developed all over the world in a truly global endeavour. A classification of electrets will be followed by a few examples of useful electret effects and exciting device applications – mainly in the area of electro-mechanical and electro-acoustical transduction which started with the invention of the electret microphone by Sessler and West in the early 1960s. Furthermore, possible synergies between electret research and ultra-high-voltage DC electrical insulation will be mentioned.

Bio: Reimund Gerhard is a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Potsdam and the current President of the IEEE Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation Society (DEIS). He graduated from the Technical University of Darmstadt as Diplom-Physiker in 1978 and earned his PhD (Doktor-Ingenieur) in Communications Engineering from TU Darmstadt in 1984. From 1985 to 1994, Gerhard was a Research Scientist and Project Manager at the Heinrich-Hertz Institute for Communications Technology (now the Fraunhofer Institute) in Berlin, Germany. He was appointed as a Professor at the University of Potsdam in 1994. From 2004 to 2012, Gerhard served as the Chairman of the Joint Board for the Master-of-Science Program in Polymer Science of FU Berlin, HU Berlin, TU Berlin, and the University of Potsdam. He also served as the Dean of the Faculty of Science at the University of Potsdam from 2008 to 2012, eventually serving as a Senator of the University of Potsdam from 2014 to 2016.

Prof. Gerhard has received many awards and honors over his long career, including an Award (ITG-Preis) from the Information Technology Society (ITG) in the VDE, a silver medal from the Foundation Werner-von-Siemens-Ring, a First Prize Technology Transfer Award Brandenburg, Whitehead Memorial Lecturer of the IEEE CEIDP, and the Award of the EuroEAP Society “for his fundamental scientific contributions in the field of transducers based on dielectric polymers.” He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). His research interests include polymer electrets with quasi-permanent space charge, ferro- or piezoelectrets (polymer films with electrically charged cavities), ferroelectric polymers with piezo- and pyroelectric properties, polymer composites with novel property combinations, physical mechanisms of dipole orientation and charge storage, electrically deformable dielectric elastomers (sometimes also called “electro-electrets”), as well as the physics of musical instruments.

Research Interests: 

  • Global or patterned electric charging or poling of dielectric polymer films (electrets)
  • Thermal (pyroelectrical) and acoustical (piezoelectrical) probing of electric-field profiles
  • Dielectric spectroscopy over large temperature and frequency ranges and at high voltages
  • Dipole orientation, ferroelectricity (switching, hysteresis, etc.), quasi-static and dynamic pyroelectricity, direct and inverse piezoelectricity in polymer films (including ferro-electrets)
  • Charge storage and transport and their molecular mechanisms in dielectric polymers
  • Dielectric elastomers (electro-electrets) and their applications in sensors and actuators
  • Demonstration and assessment of applications-relevant electro-mechanical, mechanoelectrical, and thermo-electrical transducer properties for device applications
  • Investigation of musical instruments (organs, pianos, violins) with use of polymer sensors

Note: There will be a reception after the lecture.

Nov
12
Thu
WSE Trailblazer Seminar Series: Charles Johnson-Bey PhD, JHU ECE ‘89
Nov 12 @ 3:00 pm
WSE Trailblazer Seminar Series: Charles Johnson-Bey PhD, JHU ECE ‘89

Note: This is a virtual presentation. Here is the link for where the presentation will be taking place.

Title: Think Bigger: Empower Yourself to Change the World

Abstract: During this talk, I will share some of my experiences and ultimately challenge the audience to place their research into a greater context. We must actively pursue ways to innovate by expanding our thinking about how we positively impact society. I will explore how a kid from East Baltimore grew up and developed the tools, skills, and abilities to thrive in a career where he currently leverages the best technology and expertise from around the globe in order to translate ideas into solutions that solve some of the world’s most complex problems.

Bio: Dr. Charles Johnson-Bey is a Senior Vice President at Booz Allen Hamilton. He is a global leader in technology innovation and uniquely leverages the intersection of technology, strategy, and business to create & capture value, lead change and drive execution. Dr. Johnson-Bey has more than 25 years of engineering experience spanning cyber resilience, signal processing, system architecture, prototyping, and hardware. Prior to joining Booz Allen, he was a research engineer at Motorola Corporate Research Labs and Corning Incorporated and taught electrical engineering at Morgan State University. He also worked at Lockheed Martin Corporation for 17 years, where he galvanized the company’s cyber resources and led research and development activities with organizations including Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Microsoft Research, and the GE Global Research Center. He serves on the Whiting School of Engineering Advisory Board and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Advisory Committee, both at Johns Hopkins University. He is also on the Cybersecurity Institute Advisory Board for the Community College of Baltimore County. Dr. Johnson-Bey received a B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and both an M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Delaware.

This event is co-hosted by the ECE Department and the Whiting School of Engineering.

Mar
24
Wed
55th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems (CISS 2021)
Mar 24 – Mar 26 all-day

55th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems (CISS)

March 24, 25, & 26, 2021

Hosted by the
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
and Technical Co-sponsorship by the IEEE Information Theory Society

CISS 2021 is a forum for scientists, engineers, and academics to present their latest research results and developments in multiple areas of Information Sciences and Systems. Authors will present unpublished papers describing theoretical advances, applications, and ideas in the fields of:

  • Information Theory
  • Communications
  • Energy Systems
  • Signal Processing
  • Image Processing,
  • Coding, Systems and Control
  • Optimization
  • Quantum Systems
  • Machine Learning
  • Security and Privacy
  • Statistical Inference
  • Biological Systems
  • Neuroscience
Back to top