Calendar

Feb
7
Thu
Seminar: Ilya Shipster @ Shaffer Hall 2
Feb 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Feb
14
Thu
Valentines Day Celebration @ ECE Student Lounge
Feb 14 all-day

Valentine Day card making and treats available all day in the ECE Student Lounge!

Feb
21
Thu
Proposal: Phillip Wilcox @ Shaffer Hall 2
Feb 21 @ 3:00 pm
Apr
5
Fri
Alumni Weekend Student Showcase @ Decker Quad Tent
Apr 5 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
May
2
Thu
Seminar: Martin Styner, University of North Carolina @ Shaffer Hall 2
May 2 @ 3:00 pm
May
7
Tue
Design Day 2019
May 7 all-day
ECE Networking Event
May 7 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Nov
7
Thu
Seminar: Ahmad R. Kirmani, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) @ Olin Hall 305
Nov 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Seminar: Ahmad R. Kirmani, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) @ Olin Hall 305

Title: Exploring scalable coating of inorganic semiconductor inks: the surface structure-property-performance correlations

Abstract: Inorganic semiconductor inks – such as colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) and transition metal oxides (MOs) – can potentially enable low-cost flexible and transparent electronics via ‘roll-to-roll’ printing. Surfaces of these nanometer-sized CQDs and MO ultra-thin films lead to surface phenomenon with implications on film formation during coating, crystallinity and charge transport. In this talk, I will describe my recent efforts aimed at understanding the crucial role of surface structure in these materials using photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Time-resolved X-ray scattering helps reveal the various stages during CQD ink-to-film transformation during blade-coating. Interesting insights include evidence of an early onset of CQD nucleation toward self-assembly and superlattice formation. I will close by discussing fresh results which suggest that nanoscale morphology significantly impacts charge transport in MO ultra-thin (≈5 nm) films. Control over crystallographic texture and film densification allows us to achieve high-performing (electron mobility ≈40 cm2V-1s-1), blade-coated MO thin-film transistors.

Bio: Dr. Ahmad R. Kirmani is a Guest Researcher in the Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the group of Dr. Dean M. DeLongchamp and Dr. Lee J. Richter. He is exploring scalable coating of inorganic semiconductor inks using X-ray scattering. He received his PhD in Materials Science and Engineering from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) under the supervision of Prof. Aram Amassian in 2017 for probing the surface structure-property relationship in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics. He has published 30 articles in high-impact journals such Advanced Materials, ACS Energy Letters and the Nature family, and is also a volunteer science writer for the Materials Research Society (MRS) since the last couple of years and has contributed 10 news articles, opinions and perspectives.

Nov
21
Thu
ECE Special Seminar: Joshua Vogelstein, JHU Department of Biomedical Engineering @ Hackerman Hall 320
Nov 21 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
ECE Special Seminar: Joshua Vogelstein, JHU Department of Biomedical Engineering @ Hackerman Hall 320

Title: A Theory and Practice of the Lifelong Learnable Forest

Abstract: Since Vapnik’s and Valiant’s seminal papers on learnability, various lines of research have generalized his concept of learning and learners. In this paper, we formally define what it means to be a lifelong learner. Given this definition, we propose the first lifelong learning algorithm with theoretical guarantees that it can perform forward transfer and reverse transfer, while not experiencing catastrophic forgetting. Our algorithm, dubbed Lifelong Learning Forests, outperforms the current state-of-the-art deep lifelong learning algorithm on the CIFAR 10-by-10 challenge problem, despite its simplicity and mathematical tractability. Our approach immediately lends to further algorithmic developments that promise to exceed current performance limits of existing approaches.

Dec
12
Thu
ECE Special Seminar: Arvind Pathak @ Hodson Hall 316
Dec 12 @ 3:00 pm – 4:15 pm
ECE Special Seminar: Arvind Pathak @ Hodson Hall 316

Title: “Honey I shrank the microscope!” And Other Adventures in Functional Imaging

Abstract: Imaging the brain in action, in awake freely behaving animals without the confounding effect of anesthetics poses unique design and experimental challenges. Moreover, imaging the evolution of disease models in the preclinical setting over their entire lifetime is also difficult with conventional imaging techniques. This lecture will describe the development and applications of a miniaturized microscope that circumvents these hurdles. This lecture will also describe how image acquisition, data visualization and engineering tools can be leveraged to answer fundamental questions in cancer, neuroscience and tissue engineering applications.

Bio: Dr. Pathak is an ideator, educator and mentor focused on transforming lives through the power of imaging. He received the BS in Electronics Engineering from the University of Poona, India. He received his PhD from the joint program in Functional Imaging between the Medical College of Wisconsin and Marquette University. During his PhD he was a Whitaker Foundation Fellow. He completed his postdoctoral fellowship at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Molecular Imaging. He is currently Associate Professor of Radiology, Oncology and Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University (JHU). His research is focused on developing new imaging methods, computational models and visualization tools to ‘make visible’ critical aspects of cancer, neurobiology and tissue engineering. His work has been recognized by multiple journal covers and awards including the Bill Negendank Award from the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) given to “outstanding young investigators in cancer MRI” and the Career Catalyst Award from the Susan Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. He serves on review panels for national and international funding agencies, and the editorial boards of imaging journals. He is dedicated to mentoring the next generation of imagers and innovators. He has mentored over sixty students, was the recipient of the ISMRM’s Outstanding Teacher Award in 2014, a 125 Hopkins Hero in 2018 for outstanding dedication to the core values of JHU, and a Career Champion Nominee in 2018 for student career guidance and support.

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