Calendar

Apr
18
Thu
Proposal: Christos Sapsanis @ Shaffer Hall 2
Apr 18 @ 3:00 pm
Apr
23
Tue
Dissertation Defense: Pegah Ghahremani @ Maryland 110
Apr 23 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Apr
24
Wed
Dissertation Defense: Nate Crookston @ Malone 137
Apr 24 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Apr
25
Thu
Proposal: Phani Nidadavolu @ Shaffer Hall 2
Apr 25 @ 3:00 pm
May
2
Thu
Seminar: Martin Styner, University of North Carolina @ Shaffer Hall 2
May 2 @ 3:00 pm
May
7
Tue
Dissertation Defense: Kate Fischl @ Shaffer 100
May 7 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
May
21
Tue
Dissertation Defense: Botong Qiu @ Shaffer 101
May 21 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm
Jul
29
Mon
Dissertation Defense: Jasper Stroud @ Maryland Hall 202
Jul 29 @ 10:00 am
Sep
12
Thu
Dissertation Defense: Milad Alemohammad @ Remsen Hall Room 1
Sep 12 @ 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm
Dissertation Defense: Milad Alemohammad @ Remsen Hall Room 1

Title: Applications of high-speed optical signal processing in high-dimensional data acquisition

Abstract: Thanks to large bandwidth, and the ability to capture large amount of information in parallel, optical technologies have transformed the way we capture, process, and communicate information. During this talk I will discuss how optical signal processing can be used in conjunction with novel data compression strategies in order to break the decades long bottleneck faced by electronic systems. I will particularly discuss utility of optical signal processing on big data applications ranging from high speed material characterization, to capturing neural signals over large volume at unprecedented depth and speed.

During the first half of this talk I will discuss how we are taking advantage of parallel image acquisition techniques in order to gain a deeper understanding of rapidly evolving combustion events over a broad spectral range. Despite the rich body of scientific research, the volatile nature of the combustion process has presented an obstacle to our understanding of the chemical kinetics involved in flame propagation and evolution. Many combustive reactions occur in the sub mili-second time scale and involve high velocity motion and interaction of fuel reagents. Hyperspectral imaging technologies are an attractive solution which combine high spatial resolution with fine spectral resolution. However, most conventional hyperspectral cameras rely on slow scanning mechanisms and therefore are ill-suited for capturing fast evolving events. The emergence of Compressive Sensing (CS) over the past decade, has opened the doors to acquiring high dimensional signals at high speed. In the first part of this talk I will discuss how novel optical techniques can be combined with CS algorithms to realize Mega Frame hyperspectral imaging platforms for material diagnostics.

The second portion of my talk will focus on high spatio-temporal neural recording applications. Multi-photon microscopy has been a major breakthrough in overcoming optical scattering when imaging individual neurons deep inside the brain of live animals. Despite the impressive image quality and robustness to scattering, point scanning multi-photon microscopes face a fundamental trade-off between the field of view (FOV) and imaging speed. Higher speed, volumetric multi-photon imaging and stimulation technologies have the potential to revolutionize monitoring of neural network activity in vivo. In this part I will discuss our efforts to develop a scalable, volumetric, two-photon neural recording technology that combines rapid, volumetric scanning of a wide illumination field with synchronized high-resolution dynamic spatial patterning within the illumination field. This approach will allow us to both rapidly address large volumes and also achieve high-resolution random access within the sub-regions of the scan. We will leverage the random access capabilities of this hardware to implement compressive and adaptive imaging strategies that maximize the image information acquired for a given time and laser energy.

 

Sep
18
Wed
Dissertation Defense: Sayak Bhattacharya @ Krieger Hall 170
Sep 18 @ 9:30 am – 11:00 am
Dissertation Defense: Sayak Bhattacharya @ Krieger Hall 170

Title: Control of pattern formation in excitable systems

Abstract: Pattern formation embodies the beauty and complexity of nature. Some patterns like traveling and rotating waves are dynamic, while others such as dots and stripes are static. Both dynamic and static patterns have been observed in a variety of physiological and biological processes such as rotating action potential waves in the brain during sleep, traveling calcium waves in the cardiac muscle, static patterns on the skins of animals, and self-regulated patterns in the animal embryo. Excitable systems represent a class of ultrasensitive systems that are capable of generating different kinds of patterns depending on the interplay between activator and inhibitor dynamics. Through manipulation of different excitable parameters, a diverse array of traveling wave and standing wave patterns can be obtained. In this thesis, I use pattern formation theory to control the excitable systems involved in cell migration and neuroscience to alter the observed phenotype, in an attempt to affect the underlying biological process.

Cell migration is critical in many processes such as cancer metastasis and wound healing. Cells move by extending periodic protrusions of their cortex, and recent years have shown that the cellular cortex is an excitable medium where waves of biochemical species organize the cellular protrusion. Altering the protrusive phenotype can drastically alter cell migration — that can potentially affect critical physiological processes. In the first part of this thesis, I use excitable wave theory to model and predict wave pattern changes in amoeboid cells.

Excitable systems originated in neuroscience, where different patterns of activity reflect different brain states. Sleep is associated with slow waves, while repeated high-frequency waves are associated with epileptic seizures. These patterns arise from the interplay between the cerebral cortex and the thalamus, which form a closed-loop architecture. In the second part of this thesis, I use a three-layer two-dimensional thalamocortical model, to explore the different parameters that may influence different spatio-temporal dynamics on the cortex.

 

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