Calendar

Oct
22
Mon
2018 Career Fair @ Glass Pavilion
Oct 22 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Oct
25
Thu
Graduate Seminar: José Torero, University of Maryland @ Hackerman Hall, B-17
Oct 25 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Enabling Structural Optimization by Introducing Quantitative Fire Dynamics

José L. Torero – John L. Bryan Chair and the Director of the Center for Disaster Resilience, A. James Clark School of Engineering, The University of Maryland

Structural optimization is a complex processes by which choices in geometry and materials result from a delicate balance of a detailed cost function. Sophisticated mathematical tools have been developed to achieve a solution that adequately analyzes all relevant variables. In addition, the cost function is expected to incorporate all solicitations and constraints the structure might need to respond to. Simultaneous management of the relevant variables, solicitations and constraints can deliver an optimized solution. Situations were variables are inappropriately described, solicitations are poorly characterized or when relative precision is not carefully considered will lead to an incorrect solution. In this presentation, fire is presented as a thermal solicitation that challenges existing structural optimization frameworks. A survey of the tools that can be used to characterize the event and its impact on the structure will be used to challenge the concept of fire as a load. Precision and outcome of tools used to assess structural performance will be contrasted with the fire dynamics tools and their capacity to provide the inputs necessary for a detailed analysis of structural behavior. Finally, the underpinnings of a new framework for structural optimization that includes fire behavior will be introduced.

Professor José L. Torero holds the John L. Bryan Chair and is the Director of the Center for Disaster Resilience at the Clark School of Engineering, University of Maryland. He works in the field of Fire Safety Engineering where he specializes in the behavior of fire in complex environments such as forests, tall buildings, novel architectures, tunnels, aircraft and spacecraft. He holds a BSc for the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (1989), and an MSc (1991) and PhD (1992) from the University of California, Berkeley. He received a Doctor of Science, Honoris Causa by Ghent University (Belgium) in 2016. José is a Chartered Engineer (UK), a Registered Professional Engineer in Queensland, a fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering, the Royal Academy of Engineering (UK) and the Royal Society of Edinburgh (UK). José joined The University of Maryland in 2017 following the appointment of Professor of Civil Engineering and Head of the School of Civil Engineering at the University of Queensland, Australia.

All civil engineering graduate seminars are FREE and open to the public. Attendance is required for all enrolled Civil Engineering graduate students.

For directions and information on parking please see Maps & Directions link at www.jhu.edu and select information on Homewood Campus.

Nov
1
Thu
Graduate Seminar: Yuri Bazilevs, Brown University @ Hackerman Hall, B-17
Nov 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

 Isogeometric Methods for Solids, Structures, and Fluid-Structure Interaction:
From Early Results to Recent Developments

Yuri Bazilevs – E. Paul Sorensen Professor of Engineering, Brown University

 This presentation is focused on Isogeometric Analysis (IGA) with applications to solids and structures, starting with early developments and results, and transitioning to more recent work. Novel IGA-based thin-shell formulations are discussed, and applications to progressive damage modeling in composite laminates due to low-velocity impact and their residual-strength prediction are shown. Fluid–structure interaction (FSI) employing IGA is also discussed, and a novel framework for air-blast-structure interaction (ABSI) based on an immersed approach coupling IGA and RKPM-based Meshfree methods is presented and verified on a set of challenging examples. The presentation is infused with examples that highlight effective uses of IGA in advanced engineering applications.

Yuri Bazilevs is the E. Paul Sorensen Chair in the School of Engineering at Brown University. He was previously a Professor and Vice Chair in the Structural Engineering Department at the University of California, San Diego. Yuri is the original developer of Isogeometric Analysis (IGA), a new computational methodology that aims to integrate engineering design (CAD) and simulation (FEM). For his research contributions Yuri received a number of awards and honors, including the 2018 ASCE Walter L. Huber Research Prize. He is included in the 2014-2018 lists of Highly Cited Researchers, both in the Engineering and Computer Science categories.


All civil engineering graduate seminars are FREE and open to the public. Attendance is required for all enrolled Civil Engineering graduate students.

For directions and information on parking please see Maps & Directions link at www.jhu.edu and select information on Homewood Campus.


Nov
8
Thu
Graduate Seminar: Karen Willcox, University of Texas at Austin @ Hackerman Hall, B-17
Nov 8 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Projection-based model reduction:

Physics-based approaches to learn low-dimensional models

Karen Willcox – Director, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas, Austin

 The field of model reduction encompasses a broad range of methods that seek efficient low-dimensional representations of an underlying high-fidelity model. A large class of model reduction methods are projection-based; that is, they derive the low-dimensional approximation by projection of the original large-scale model onto a low-dimensional subspace. Model reduction has clear connections to machine learning. The difference in fields is perhaps largely one of history and perspective: model reduction methods have grown from the scientific computing community, with a focus on reducinghigh-dimensional models that arise from physics-based modeling, whereas machine learning has grown from the computer science community, with a focus on creating low-dimensional models from black-box data streams. Yet recent years have seen an increased blending of the two perspectives and a recognition of the associated opportunities. This talk will describe a model reduction approach that combines lifting– the introduction of auxiliary variables to transform a general nonlinear model to a model with polynomial nonlinearities–with proper orthogonal decomposition. The result is a data-driven formulation to learn the low-dimensional model from high-fidelity simulation data, but a key aspect of the approach is that the lifted state-space in which the learning is achieved is derived using the problem physics. The method is demonstrated for nonlinear systems of partial differential equations arising in rocket combustion applications.

Karen E. Willcox is Director of the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES) and a Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at the University of Texas at Austin. She holds the W. A. “Tex” Moncrief, Jr. Chair in Simulation-Based Engineering and Sciences and the Peter O’Donnell, Jr. Centennial Chair in Computing Systems. Prior to joining ICES in 2018, she spent 17 years as a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she served as the founding Co-Director of the MIT Center for Computational Engineering and the Associate Head of the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Prior to joining the MIT faculty, she worked at Boeing Phantom Works with the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft design group. Her research at MIT has produced scalable computational methods for design of next-generation engineered systems, with a particular focus on model reduction as a way to learn principled approximations from data and on multi-fidelity formulations to leverage multiple sources of uncertain information. She is a Fellow of SIAM and Associate Fellow of AIAA. 


All civil engineering graduate seminars are FREE and open to the public. Attendance is required for all enrolled Civil Engineering graduate students.

For directions and information on parking please see Maps & Directions link at www.jhu.edu and select information on Homewood Campus.


Nov
14
Wed
Graduate Program Online Information Session
Nov 14 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Join us to hear from faculty and students about programs, research, and student life within the Department of Civil Engineering!

November 14, 2018
10 AM EST

Register Today!

Nov
15
Thu
Graduate Seminar: Nii Attoh-Okine, University of Delaware @ Hackerman Hall, B-17
Nov 15 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Quantum Blockchain and Society 5.0
– Cyber Resilience of the Future –

Nii Attoh-Okine – Professor and Interim Academic Director, University of Delaware Cybersecurity Initiative

Currently, quantum computing – a theory of computation based on principles of quantum mechanics – is becoming a new information processing model. The properties of quantum are more superior than classical computing will have major consequences. In the recent years, blockchain is moving from more traditional Bitcoin applications to various facets of society. The advantages range from higher transparency to process efficiency to increased resilience against various attacks. The current blockchains rely on digital signatures that can be vulnerable to quantum computing. As we move to more and diverse applications of the blockchain technology, the traditional blockchain can have both security and speed flaws and it is more likely that quantum computing may make the blockchain vulnerable. This talk will focus on how the quantum blockchain is a key cyber resilience tool in the implementation of Smart Cities and especially Society 5.0.

In the talk, I will discuss the basis of blockchain technology and some of the vulnerabilities manifested in quantum computing. I will attempt to connect how the basic principles of quantum computing, qubit, non-separability (entanglement) of quantum systems, including Bell States and GHZ (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger) states, are discussed in quantum blockchain framework.

Nii O. Attoh-Okine, Ph.D., P.E., F. ASCE, Snr Member IEEE, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is also the Interim Academic Director of the University of Delaware Cybersecurity Initiative. In the last couple of years, he has authored two books which are defining the direction of research across disciplines: a) Resilience Engineering: Models and Analysis [Cambridge Press 2016] and b) Big Data and Differential Privacy in Railway Track Engineering [John Wiley 2017]. He is a founding associate editor for ASCE/ASME Journal of Risk and Uncertainty Analysis. He has served as an Associate Editor on the following ASCE Journals: a) ASCE Journal of Infrastructure Systems; b) ASCE Journal of Computing; c) ASCE Journal of Bridge Engineering; d) ASCE Journal of Pipeline Systems Engineering and Practice. Attoh-Okine is currently a member of a group of researchers from the United States and Japan working on Smart Cities and various cyber issues related to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.


All civil engineering graduate seminars are FREE and open to the public. Attendance is required for all enrolled Civil Engineering graduate students.

For directions and information on parking please see Maps & Directions link at www.jhu.edu and select information on Homewood Campus.


Nov
29
Thu
Graduate Seminar: Amit Varma, Purdue University @ Hackerman Hall, B-17
Nov 29 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

All civil engineering graduate seminars are FREE and open to the public. Attendance is required for all enrolled Civil Engineering graduate students.

For directions and information on parking please see Maps & Directions link at www.jhu.edu and select information on Homewood Campus.

Feb
28
Thu
Graduate Seminar: Celeste Chavis, Morgan State University @ Hackerman Hall, B-17
Feb 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

All civil engineering graduate seminars are FREE and open to the public. Attendance is required for all enrolled Civil Engineering graduate students.

For directions and information on parking please see Maps & Directions link at www.jhu.edu and select information on Homewood Campus.

Mar
13
Wed
2019 Richard J. Carroll Memorial Lectureship
Mar 13 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

The Richard J. Carroll Memorial Lectureship in Civil Engineering was established at The Johns Hopkins University to commemorate one of Baltimore’s leading structural engineers. The lectureship has been endowed by the many friends and admirers of Richard Carroll, who died in 1982. That endowment contributes to the ongoing guest seminars in the Department of Civil Engineering and provides for these special lectures.

Richard J. Carroll received his bachelor of civil engineering degree from Villanova University in 1955. He studied advanced structural design at The Johns Hopkins University and George Washington University. He was chief structural engineer for the firms of Knoerle, Bender, Stone, and Associates, and Ewell, Bomhardt and Associates and chief field engineer for the Portland Cement Association. In 1964 he founded his own firm, Carroll Engineering, Inc., which grew to 26 employees under his leadership. Mr. Carroll published several papers dealing with concrete use and design, with emphasis on post-tensioned and pre-stressed concrete. He also taught courses in ultimate strength design and plastic design in steel. He belonged to numerous professional societies. His untimely death at the age of 49 left a legacy of professionalism, integrity, and vigor.

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