General Information

Notes regarding AP/IB Credits and Waivers

Students often matriculate at Johns Hopkins with AP or IB credit towards Calculus, Physics, and Chemistry. The following tables show the credits awarded by Johns Hopkins for specific scores on AP/IB exams.

 

AP Exam

Score

Credits
Awarded
Biology

5

6

Calculus AB

5

4

Calculus BC

3 or 4

4

Calculus BC

5

8

Chemistry

5

8

Chemistry

4

4

Computer Science A

5

3

Environmental Science

4 or 5

4

French Language**

4 or 5

6

German Language**

4 or 5

6

Italian Language**  4 or 5  6
Macroeconomics*

5

3

Microeconomics*

5

3

Physics C (Mech)

4 or 5

4

Physics C (E&M)

4 or 5

4

Statistics

4 or 5

4

*Policies regarding Economics: Students majoring or minoring in Economics must take an additional advanced course for each AP Economics course that receives credit. ALL students who wish to receive credit for the AP Microeconomics exam must contact Dr. Bruce Hamilton in the Economics Department and arrange to take an additional exam upon arrival at JHU.
***Policy regarding French, German, and Italian Language Exams: Students scoring 4 or 5 on the AP exam for any of these languages may receive 6 credits AFTER successfully completing two Hopkins courses in that same language sequence at the intermediate level or higher.

 

IB Exam

Score

Credits
Awarded
Biology

6 or 7

6

Chemistry

6 or 7

8

Computer Science

6 or 7

3

Macroeconomics*

7

3

Microeconomics*

7

3

Mathematics

6 or 7

4

Physics

6

4

Physics

7

8

 

Important details for advisors and students to note about AP/IB credits:

 

  • The department generally advises that students retake a calculus course, even if they earned a high enough AP score to receive credit for it.  High school calculus and college-level calculus are not the same, and skipping Calculus I or II at JHU may place students at a disadvantage further down their academic path. The Mathematics Department has this to say about it.
  • If a student does not have AP Calculus credit, but takes the math placement exam upon matriculating at JHU (details in the link above), he or she may be granted a waiver to skip a course, say Calculus I, and move on to the next course, say Calculus II. However, a waiver does not change the number of credits required in mathematics on the student’s degree checkout sheet; it simply allows the student to exchange one mathematics class for a different mathematics class.
  • The maximum credits granted by JHU for AP Physics (Mech) is 4 and for AP Physics (E&M) is 4. However, Physics I and Physics I Lab are 5 credits altogether, as are Physics II and Physics II Lab. Therefore, if AP Physics credit is granted, only 4 credits towards the course are applied; the 1 credit lab is typically granted a waiver, not credit. This means that the student does not have to take Physics I Lab, but must take 1 cr. in another basic science lab to fulfill the number of basic science credits required in the degree checkout sheet. Note: a student may choose to retake Physics I Lab, which is allowed.
  •  

    The following list of technical electives includes courses approved by faculty; however, this is not an exhaustive list.  Please check SIS and discuss any other course options with your advisor on a case-by-case basis. 

     

    Civil Engineering

    560.330 (E) Foundation Design (3 cr.)
    560.404 (E) Solid Mechanics for Structures (3 cr.)
    560.423 (E) Bridge Engineering (3 cr.)
    560.429 (E) Preservation Engineering I: Theory & Practice (3 cr.)
    560.430 (E) Applied Finite Element Methods (3 cr.)
    560.431 (E) Preservation Engineering II: Theory & Practice (3 cr.)
    560.434 (E) Structural Fire Engineering (3 cr.)
    560.442 (E) Equilibrium Models in Systems Engineering (3 cr.)
    560.445 (E) Advanced Structural Analysis (3 cr.)
    560.458 (E) Natural Disaster Risk Modeling (3 cr.)
    560.460 (E) Applied Structural Optimization (3 cr.)
    560.525/6 Independent Study in Civil Engineering (1-3 cr.)

     

    Civil Engineering (courses offered through the Engineering for Professionals program)

    565.415 (E) Applied Finite Element Methods (3 cr.)
    565.430 (E) Design of Wood Structures (3 cr.)
    565.605 (E) Adv. Steel Design (3 cr.)
    565.610 (E) Analysis & Renovation of Existing Lateral Force Systems (3 cr.)
    565.615 (E) Investigation, Diagnosis, and Rehabilitation (3 cr.)
    565.620 (E) Advanced Steel Design (3 cr.)
    565.630 (E) Prestressed Concrete Design (3 cr.)

     

    Applied Mathematics & Statistics

    550.361/2 (Q,E) Introduction to Optimization (4 cr.)

     

    Environmental Engineering

    570.303 (E,N) Environmental Engineering Principles & Applications (3 cr.)
    570.305 (E,N) Environmental Engineering Systems Design (4 cr.)
    570.320 (E,S) Topics on Appropriate & Sustainable Tech. / Developing Countries (1 cr.)
    570.321 (E) Pract. Appropriate & Sustainable Tech. / Developing Communities (2 cr.)
    570.353 (E) Hydrology (3 cr.)
    570.432 (E,N) Sediment Transport and River Mechanics (3 cr.)
    570.445 (E) Physical and Chemical Processes in Environmental Engineering I (3 cr.)
    570.446 (E,N) Biological Processes for Water and Wastewater Treatment (3 cr.)
    570.448 (E) Physical and Chemical Processes in Environmental Engineering II (3 cr.)
    570.491 (E) Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal (3 cr.)
    570.493 (Q,S) Economic Foundations for Public Decision Making (3 cr.)
    570.495 (E,Q) Foundations of Optimization for Planning and Policy (3 cr.)
    570.497 (E,Q) Risk and Decision Analysis (3 cr.)

     

    Mechanical Engineering

    530.354 (E) Manufacturing Engineering (3 cr.)
    530.430 (E) Applied Finite Element Methods (3 cr.)
    530.464 (E) Energy Systems Analysis (3 cr.)

     

    Earth & Planetary Sciences

    270.305 (N) Energy Resources in the Modern World (3 cr.)
    270.308 (N) Population/Community Ecology (3 cr.)
    270.314 (N) Planetary Tectonics & Geodynamics (3 cr.)
    270.315 (N) Natural Catastrophes (3 cr.)
    270.350 (N) Sedimentary Geology (3 cr.)

     

  • Students are encouraged to explore their non-engineering interests, which the faculty views as an integral part of a sound education. Furthermore, since civil engineers provide professional services to the public and have significant influence on society, it is important that they have an appreciation of societal concerns and humanistic issues.

    Students should develop coherent programs featuring reasonable depth. Students shall not satisfy the non-technical electives requirement by taking exclusively introductory (100-level) courses. Faculty advisors have sample programs in a document entitled “Making the most of Distribution Credits” that may prove helpful.

    Through an appropriate selection of courses reflecting a well-planned program, students may gain an appreciation of societal and cultural issues, philosophy and the arts, in addition to communication and economic values. For those desiring general guidance on the philosophy of such program selection, the Department of Civil Engineering has a copy of Social Responsibilities in Engineering and Science; A Guide for Selecting General Education Courses by R.H. McCuen and J.M. Wallace. This is available for loan in the Department office.

  • Consistent with the JHU Catalog, no more than one course (other than courses of 1 credit or less) may be taken as S/U in any term. No course listed as a requirement in this Advising Manual for Undergraduate Majors in Civil Engineering may be taken S/U. This includes cases where alternative courses are specified.

    A maximum of 3 credits from H/S electives may be taken S/U. These 3 credits may come from a single 3-credit course or the compilation of a few intersession courses (which generally only offer S/U grading).

    A technical elective (mathematics, natural science, or engineering) may only be taken S/U with the approval of the advisor. Generally, such approval will be granted only if the course is outside of the student’s major field of interest or is an advanced level course intended primarily for graduate students.

    The University has special requirements that limit the number of D-credits students are allowed to accumulate. Students should consult the JHU Catalog for guidelines. In addition, the Department requires that no graduating student have more than 2 grades of D in the required engineering courses and technical electives.

 

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