Calendar

Dec
6
Thu
Corrsin Lecture: Aleksandr Noy (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory): “Nanofluidics in carbon nanotube porins” @ Room 3, Shaffer Hall
Dec 6 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Reception at 3 pm.

Feb
7
Thu
Spring 2019 ChemBE Seminar Series – Matt DeLisa (Cornell Univ) “Adventures in Bacterial Glycobiology: Engineering Sweet Solutions to Sticky Situations” @ Krieger 205
Feb 7 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Refreshments will be served at 10:00am.
Attendance will be taken at the conclusion of the presentation.

Carbohydrates add a level of diversity across all forms of life that is unparalleled by the information content of nucleic acids and proteins. The lack of a simple template to translate aglycan code into defined sugar structures contributes to this complexity and provides a challenge for efforts aimed at the production of biologically important glycans and glycoconjugates. With the discovery of glycoprotein synthesis in bacteria and functional transfer of glycosylation pathways between species, Escherichia coli cells have become a tractable host for understanding glycosylation and the underlying glycan code of living cells. Moreover, efforts to manipulate the pathways from sugar nucleotides to glycolipids to glycoproteins have transformed E. coli into a living factory for scalable, bottom-up production of complex glycoconjugates by design. Here, I will discuss our efforts to develop E. coli for the biosynthesis of a diverse array of glycan structures, which can be used to tailor the activity, stability, half-life, and immunogenicity of a given biopharmaceutical. I will also discuss our efforts to unify protein glycosylation in E. coli with the advanced tools of protein engineering such as cell surface and phage display technologies. The result is a powerful new way to engineer the enzymes, pathways, end-products, and genomes of glycoengineered bacteria for creating the next generation of protein therapeutics and vaccines for a wide range of human diseases.

 

Matthew P. DeLisa is the William L. Lewis Professor of Engineering in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell University. His research focuses on understanding and controlling the molecular mechanisms underlying protein biogenesis – folding and assembly, membrane translocation and post-translational modifications – in the complex environment of a living cell. Professor DeLisa received a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Connecticut in 1996; a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Maryland in 2001; and did postdoctoral work at the University of Texas-Austin, Department of Chemical Engineering. DeLisa joined the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell University in 2003. He has also served as a Gastprofessur at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich) in the Institut für Mikrobiologie.

Feb
14
Thu
Spring 2019 ChemBE Seminar Series – Andre Palmer (Ohio State Univ) “Engineering Polymerized Hemoglobins for Use in Transfusion Medicine and Tissue ENGINEERING” @ Krieger 205
Feb 14 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Refreshments will be served at 10:00am.
Attendance will be taken at the conclusion of the presentation.

Universal O2-carrying solutions that can replace the O2 storage and transport functions of red blood cells (RBCs) will greatly improve clinical outcomes for trauma victims and patients undergoing high-blood-loss surgical procedures. These O2 carriers are to be used when blood is not readily available, such as on the battlefield, during natural disasters, at the site of a terrorist attack or in rural areas without hospital access. My talk will address a simple approach for designing hemoglobin-based O2 carriers (HBOCs) as RBC substitutes. Our design strategy is based on the observation that transfusion of cell-free hemoglobin results in vasoconstriction, systemic hypertension and oxidative tissue injury. The root cause of these side-effects stem from the ability of hemoglobin to extravasate through pores lining the wall of blood vessels, and consequently scavenge nitric oxide from the surrounding vasculature as well as catalyze production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, our design strategy will focus on increasing the molecular diameter of HBOCs so that they are unable to traverse across the wall of blood vessels into the tissue space to limit/prevent these side-effects. In this talk, I will discuss the design, biophysical properties and in vivo response of polymerized hemoglobin (a class of HBOC).

 

Professor Palmer is author of more than 100 peer reviewed publications. Among others, he received the National Science Foundation Career Award, and the Harrison Faculty Award for Excellence in Engineering Education from The Ohio State University College of Engineering. Prof. Palmer currently serves on the International Scientific Advisory Committee on Blood Substitutes, and is a member of the Bioengineering, Technology, and Surgical Sciences Study Section at the National Institutes of Health. In 2015, he was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and appointed chair of the William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical Engineering at The Ohio State University. Palmer’s research is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense.

Feb
28
Thu
Spring 2019 ChemBE Seminar Series – Eric Peng of Biogen, Inc. @ Krieger 205
Feb 28 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Refreshments will be served at 10:00am.
Attendance taken at the conclusion of the presentation.

Mar
7
Thu
Spring 2019 ChemBE Seminar Series – Eric Stach (University of PA) “Using In-situ and Operando Methods to Characterize Working Catalysts” @ Krieger 205
Mar 7 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Refreshments will be served at 10:00am.
Attendance prior to the presentation.

The field of electron microscopy has seen dramatic advances in the past decade, with the development of advanced electron optics such as aberration-correctors and source monchromators, new detector modalities and advances in sample manipulation and probing. In this talk, I will describe how electron microscopy can be used to relate the structure and composition of catalytic nanoparticles to their performance using real time methods. Specifically, I will describe how environmental transmission electron microscopy can be used to create real time movies of the nucleation, growth and growth termination of carbon nanotubes. Thereafter, I will detail new methods that are being developed to characterize working catalysts in operando conditions using a closed-cell micro reactor which allows imaging at atmospheric pressure. Finally, I will describe how this same micro reactor allows correlated measurements to be obtained from both electron microscopy and x-ray spectroscopy and diffraction using advanced synchrotron facilities such as those found at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s National Synchrotron Light Source-II.

Eric Stach is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his B.S.E from Duke University, M.S.M.S.E. from the University of Washington, his Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Virginia. He has held positions as Staff Scientist and Principal Investigator at the National Center for Electron Microscopy at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, as Associate, then Full Professor at Purdue University, and as Group Leader at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. He is a Co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of Hummingbird Scientific. He is also Secretary of the Board of Directors for the Materials Research Society.

Mar
14
Thu
Spring 2019 ChemBE Seminar Series – Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos (Tufts University) “Single Metal Atoms as Game-Changers in Heterogeneous Catalysis” @ Gilman Hall 50
Mar 14 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Refreshments will be served at 10:00am.
Attendance prior to the presentation.

Controlling ion and water transport on a molecular scale is important for applications ranging from industrial water treatment, to membrane separations, to bioelectronic interface design. Living systems move ions and small molecules across biological membranes using protein pores that rely on nanoscale confinement effects to achieve efficient and exquisitely-selective transport. I will show that carbon nanotube porins—pore channels formed by ultra-short carbon nanotubes assembled in a lipid membrane—can exploit similar physical principles to transport water, protons, and small ions with efficiency that rivals and sometimes exceeds that of biological channels. I will discuss the role of molecular confinement and slip flow in these pores and show how it can enhance water and proton transport efficiency and influence the mechanisms of ion selectivity in these pores. Overall, carbon nanotube porins represent simple and versatile biomimetic membrane pores that are ideal for studying nanoscale transport phenomena and building the next generation of separation technologies and biointerfaces.

Alex Noy is a Senior Research Scientist at LLNL, which he joined as the Lab’s first E.O. Lawrence Fellow after getting his BA in Chemistry from Moscow University in his native Russia and a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Harvard University. Noy is also an Adjunct Professor at the University of California Merced. His research group works at the intersection of biophysics and nanoscience and specializes in using one-dimensional nanomaterials to build biomimetic and bioengineered structures to control transport and communication at molecular scale. The current research portfolio in the Noy group centers on carbon nanotube nanofluidics, where they develop carbon nanotube porins and membranes to study transport in highly-confined environment and develop new separation technologies. Other projects in the group develop novel biolectronic devices that incorporate functional biological and biomimetic components to create seamless bidirectional neural interfaces and use high speed atomic force microscopy to image biological processes in-situ in real time.

Apr
11
Thu
Spring 2019 ChemBE Seminar Series – Scott Shell (University of California, Santa Barbara) “Simulation Design of Interfaces Through Shape and Chemistry” @ Krieger 205
Apr 11 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Simulation Design of Interfaces Through Shape and Chemistry

Ab: The patterning of interfaces, both chemical and structural, directs an enormous range of thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the fluids that meet them. Here, we present two examples where molecular simulations allow systematic charting of the effects of different interfacial configurations, which in turn offers design principles for engineering desired structures and behaviors. In the first, we examine a route to chiral surfaces through the self-assembly of achiral, quasi-2D colloidal particles of tunable shapes. We show that a surprisingly simple mechanism, based only on excluded volume interactions, can drive achiral particles into chiral materials. The mechanism quantitatively explains recent experimental results, predicts new chiral-prone shapes, and suggests a way that chiral structures might emerge in nature. In the second part, we show that precise hydrophobic/hydrophilic chemical patterning on a variety of solid surfaces provides an important way to control the dynamic behavior of adjacent water. We develop a novel genetic optimization algorithm, coupled to iterative molecular dynamic simulations, that designs the arrangement of surface groups so as to minimize or maximize the diffusion nearby water. Surprisingly, the algorithm uncovers novel surface designs that produce a wide range of dynamics for a given constant average surface hydrophobicity fraction.

Bio: Prof. M. Scott Shell is Professor and Vice Chair of Chemical Engineering at the University of California Santa Barbara. He earned his B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon in 2000 and his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Princeton in 2005, followed by a postdoc in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry at UC San Francisco from 2005-07. Prof. Shell’s group develops novel molecular simulation, multiscale modeling, and statistical thermodynamic approaches to address problems in contemporary biophysics and soft condensed matter. Recent areas of interest include self-assembled peptide materials, nanobubbles, hydrophobic interfaces, colloid-polymer materials, and nanoparticle-membrane interactions. He is the recipient of a Dreyfus Foundation New Faculty Award (2007), an NSF CAREER Award (2009), a Hellman Family Faculty Fellowship (2010), a Northrop-Grumman Teaching Award (2011), a Sloan Research Fellowship (2012), a UCSB Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award (2014), the Dudley A. Saville Lectureship at Princeton (2015), and the CoMSEF Impact Award from AIChE (2017).

Apr
18
Thu
Spring 2019 ChemBE Seminar Series – Sharon Glotzer (University of Michigan) The John C. and Florence W. Holtz Lecture @ Gilman 50
Apr 18 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Bio: Sharon C. Glotzer is the Anthony C. Lembke Department Chair of Chemical Engineering at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Glotzer is also the John Werner Cahn Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and the Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering, and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Physics, Applied Physics, and Macromolecular Science and Engineering. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Materials Research Society, and the Royal Society of Chemistry. Professor Glotzer’s research on computational assembly science and engineering aims toward predictive materials design of colloidal and soft matter, and is sponsored by the NSF, DOE, DOD, and Simons Foundation. Using computation, geometrical concepts, and statistical mechanics, her group seeks to understand complex behavior emerging from simple rules and forces, and use that knowledge to design new classes of materials. Her introduction of the notion of “patchy particles,” a conceptual approach to nanoparticle design, has informed wide-ranging investigations of self-assembly. She showed that entropy alone can assemble shapes into many structures, which has implications for materials science, thermodynamics, mathematics, nanotechnology, biology and more. Her group’s “shape space diagram” shows how matter self-organizes based on the shapes of the constituent elements, making it possible to predict what kind of ordered material will emerge from disorder. Her group also develops and disseminates powerful open-source software, including the particle simulation toolkit, HOOMD-blue, which allows for fast simulation of materials on graphics processors. Glotzer has published over 240 refereed papers and presented over 350 plenary, keynote and invited talks around the world. She has served on boards and advisory committees of the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the National Academies, and is currently a member of the National Academies Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. She is a Simons Investigator, a former National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow, and the recipient of numerous other awards and honors, including the 2019 Aneesur Rahman Prize for Computational Physics from the American Physical Society, the 2018 Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum Award and the 2016 Alpha Chi Sigma Award both from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the 2014 MRS Medal from the Materials Research Society.

Apr
25
Thu
Spring 2019 ChemBE Seminar Series – Matt Paszek (Cornell) “Sugary Nanoassemblies Trigger the Unique Behaviors of Tumor Cells” @ Krieger 205
Apr 25 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Sugary Nanoassemblies Trigger the Unique Behaviors of Tumor Cells

Tumor cells exploit basic physical principles to override biological constraints and acquire more lethal characteristics. This hallmark is particularly true at the cell surface where aggressive cancer cells deregulate their signaling systems and reshape their membrane into forms that promote dissemination. During the seminar, I will discuss simple entropic driving forces that sculpt the morphology of the cancer cell surface. Notably, complex sugar and protein co-polymers are assembled at high density on the cancer cell membrane to form a dense structure that is referred to as the glycocalyx. Remarkably, super-resolution optical techniques reveal that glycocalyx polymers obey classical Alexander – de Gennes scaling laws, which can be applied to predict tumor cell morphologies and the effects of biopolymer density, length and charge on membrane shapes. I also will discuss our new tools for editing the glycocalyx and how we can exert entropic control over receptor-mediated signaling.

 

Bio: Dr. Matthew J Paszek is an Assistant Professor in the Robert Frederick Smith School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell University. His research interests are in chemical biology, physical biology and bioengineering, with a particular interest in the functioning of glycans in multicellular life and disease biology. Towards this end, his lab develops optical technologies and experimental approaches that enable new lines of inquiry in glycoscience. Prior to Cornell, Dr. Paszek investigated the mechanobiology of cancer under the mentorship of Drs. Daniel Hammer and Valerie Weaver at the University of Pennsylvania, where he obtained his Ph.D. Dr. Paszek expanded on his graduate studies as a Postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco, during which time he developed new methods for nanoscale cellular imaging and identified a fundamental role for the glycocalyx in the physical organization and activation of cell-surface receptors in cancer.

May
2
Thu
Spring 2019 ChemBE Seminar Series – David Oupicky (University of Nebraska, Medical Center) “Development of Pharmacologically Active Delivery Systems to Target Chemokine Networks in Metastatic Cancer and Organ Fibrosis” @ Krieger 205
May 2 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am

Development of Pharmacologically Active Delivery Systems to Target Chemokine Networks in Metastatic Cancer and Organ Fibrosis

Chemokine networks control cell movement to specific locations throughout the body as part of normal homeostasis and during pathological processes such as cancer, inflammation, and fibrogenesis. In tumors, a complex chemokine network controls cell trafficking into and out of the tumor microenvironment. The tumor chemokine network also participates in angiogenesis and generation of the fibroblast stroma. Importantly, chemokine networks are directly involved in the molecular control of metastasis and govern organ-specific homing of metastatic cells, which makes them promising targets for the development of antimetastatic therapies. The CXCR4 axis is also involved in mediating the infiltration and migration of inflammatory cells during pulmonary fibrosis. I will present our progress in the development of polymer drugs that target chemokine receptor CXCR4 as part of combination therapies in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer and pulmonary fibrosis.

Bio: David Oupický is a Parke-Davis Professor of Pharmaceutics at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC). He obtained his MS degree in Polymer Engineering from the University of Chemical Technology in Prague in 1993 and his Ph.D. degree in Macromolecular Chemistry (1999) with Prof. Karel Ulbrich at the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. He was a postdoctoral fellow with Prof. Len Seymour at the CRC Institute for Cancer Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK from 1999 until 2002, when he became an Assistant Professor and then an Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Wayne State University, Detroit. After 10 years as a faculty at Wayne State University in Detroit, he joined UNMC. His research interests include synthesis of novel polymers and development of drug and nucleic acid delivery systems.

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