Calendar

Apr
16
Thu
Seminar: Rema Padman (Carnegie Mellon University)
Apr 16 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

More details to come!

All graduate seminars hosted by the Department of Civil and Systems Engineering are FREE and open to the public. Attendance is required for all enrolled CaSE graduate students.

For directions and information on parking please see Maps & Directions link at www.jhu.edu and select information on Homewood Campus.

Apr
30
Thu
Seminar: Brian Denton (University of Michigan)
Apr 30 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Dealing with Model Uncertainty in Markov Decision Processes for Chronic Diseases

Brian Denton
Professor and Chair, Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering
University of Michigan

 

Optimization of sequential decision-making under uncertainty is important in many contexts, including chronic diseases, but ambiguity in the underlying models introduces significant challenges. In the context of chronic disease management, Markov decision processes (MDPs) have been used to optimize the delivery of medical interventions in a way that balances the immediate harms and costs with the uncertain future health benefits associated with these interventions. Unfortunately, treatment recommendations that result from MDPs can depend heavily on the model of the chronic disease, and there are often multiple plausible models due to conflicting data sources or differing opinions among medical experts. To address this problem, we introduce a new framework in which a decision-maker can consider multiple models of the MDP’s ambiguous parameters and seeks to find a strategy that maximizes the weighted performance with respect to each of these models of the MDP. We establish connections to other models in the stochastic optimization literature, derive complexity results, and establish solution methods for solving these problems. We illustrate our approach in the context of preventative treatment for cardiovascular disease, and end with a summary of the most important conclusions of our study.

Brian Denton’s research interests are in data-driven sequential decision making and optimization under uncertainty with applications to medicine. He is Chair of the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering and he has a cross-appointment in the School of Medicine at University of Michigan.  Before joining the University of Michigan he worked at IBM, Mayo Clinic, and North Carolina State University. He has co-authored more than 100 journal articles, conference proceedings, book chapters, and patents. He is past Chair of the INFORMS Health Applications Section, past Secretary of INFORMS, and past President of INFORMS.


All graduate seminars hosted by the Department of Civil and Systems Engineering are FREE and open to the public. Attendance is required for all enrolled CaSE graduate students.

For directions and information on parking please see Maps & Directions link at www.jhu.edu and select information on Homewood Campus.

May
5
Tue
Senior Design Day & Blue Hat Ceremony
May 5 @ 1:30 pm – 5:00 pm

More details coming soon!

May
7
Thu
Seminar: Karen Smilowitz (Northwestern University)
May 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

On the Use of Operations Research Methods for the Design of School Districts

Karen Smilowitz
James N. and Margie M. Krebs Professor in Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences
Northwestern University

Operations research methods have been used to identify and evaluate solutions to the reconfiguration of public school attendance area boundaries for over fifty years. In broad terms, the school redistricting problem seeks to find capacity-feasible assignments of students in a school district to local schools.  This talk will present analysis of the use of operations research for school districting.   The talk will feature a review of the literature, exploring connections between evolving issues in public education and advances in optimization, computing and geographic information systems.  Much of the early work was motivated by Supreme Court decisions to desegregate schools (Brown v. Board of Education, Brown II, Green v. New Kent, Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg).  Around that time, papers appeared in the operations research literature proposing analytical approaches to school desegregation that made use of advances in linear programming.  The talk will examine ways in which these papers modeled the trade-offs between achieving racial balance and minimizing travel distance for students, and the extent to which the resulting analysis impacted policy and court cases.  We will also discuss how the limitations of early models and solution approaches hindered their applicability.  The years since have seen new directions in research to address additional challenges related to the design of school attendance boundaries and leverage emerging advances in optimization, computing, and geographic information systems technology.  The talk will end with a reflection of the current discussion around school busing and the ways in which operations research can be part of that discussion.

Dr. Karen Smilowitz is the James N. and Margie M. Krebs Professor in Industrial Engineering and Management Science at Northwestern University, with a joint appointment in the Operations group at the Kellogg School of Business. Dr. Smilowitz is an expert in modeling and solution approaches for logistics and transportation systems in both commercial and non-profit applications, working with transportation providers, logistics specialists and a range of non-profit organizations. Dr.  Smilowitz is the founder of the Northwestern Initiative on Humanitarian and Non-Profit Logistics. She has been instrumental in promoting the use of operations research within the humanitarian and nonprofit sectors through the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the National Academy of Engineering, as well as various media outlets. Dr. Smilowitz is an Associate Editor for Transportation Science and Operations Research.  Dr. Smilowitz received the Award for the Advancement of Women in OR/MS from INFORMS and led the winning team in the INFORMS Innovative Applications of Analytics Award.


All graduate seminars hosted by the Department of Civil and Systems Engineering are FREE and open to the public. Attendance is required for all enrolled CaSE graduate students.

For directions and information on parking please see Maps & Directions link at www.jhu.edu and select information on Homewood Campus.

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