Calendar

Jan
28
Thu
Seminar: Jay Wilson, Resiliency Coordinator, Clackamas County Disaster Management
Jan 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Resilience Policy, Programs, and Practice

Jay Wilson – Resiliency Coordinator, Clackamas County Disaster Management

NON-JHU PARTICIPANTS – RSVP to attend by visiting https://forms.gle/Fq5tSd3jpEJ3MML89

As an emergency management practitioner, Jay Wilson has worked his entire 23 year career in the arena of hazard mitigation. During the past decade, he has been an advocate for the pursuit of disaster resilience as a comprehensive strategy for adapting to natural hazards in order to support sustainable community development. Jay’s experience with local, regional, state and national resilience programs reflects how technical approaches to reduce risk need to be aligned with a community’s social and economic needs. He will discuss a number of examples on the subject of implementing community resilience, which includes strategic planning for seismic upgrades to an urban water system, community engagement on seismic design for a critical bridge replacement, and the social equity challenges of retrofitting unreinforced masonry buildings. He will also draw from the development of the 2013 Oregon Resilience Plan and the 2015 NIST Community Resilience Plan and use examples from his two EERI Learning from Earthquakes reconnaissance trips to Japan in 2011 and to Central Italy in 2017.

Jay Wilson is the Clackamas County Resilience Coordinator with the Department of Disaster Management and manages the County’s hazard mitigation program. Mr. Wilson is the past-Chair (2014-17) of the Oregon Seismic Safety Policy Advisory Commission (OSSPAC) and previously worked for Oregon Emergency Management as the Earthquake, Tsunami, and Volcano Programs Coordinator and for five years as a Mitigation Reservist with FEMA Regions IX and X. Jay served as a Resilience Fellow with the National Institute of Standards and Technology during the development of the 2015 Community Resilience Planning Guide. Jay holds an M.A. in geography and a B.A. in film and lives in Portland, Oregon.

Feb
4
Thu
Seminar: Prof. Prashant K. Purohit, University of Pennsylvania
Feb 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Mechanics and Rupture of Blood Clots

Prashant K. Purohit
Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics
University of Pennsylvania

NON-JHU PARTICIPANTS – RSVP to attend by visiting https://forms.gle/Fq5tSd3jpEJ3MML89

Fibrin, a polymeric proteinaceous network, resulting from blood clotting, naturally acts as the mechanical scaffold of hemostatic blood clots and obstructive thrombi. In addition, fibrin-based biomaterials, known as fibrin glues or sealants, are widely used in surgery to prevent bleeding from wounds of various origins. It is critically important that fibrin is mechanically tough and resistant to fracture, as it must withstand forces of blood flow. We have developed an estimate of fibrin toughness by examining the mode-I rupture of macroscopic fibrin plasma clots of millimeter size, in which we inserted edge cracks perpendicular to the axis of extension. We calculated the critical energy release rate from the force-displacement curves of these specimens using the methods of Rivlin and Thomas for rubbers undergoing large deformations and determined it to be on the order of 7.6 J/m^2. Finite element modeling based on fibrin constitutive laws accounting for unfolding of monomers and large volume changes due to loss of water from the clots independently confirmed this critical energy release rate. In a separate set of experiments and models we have characterized the compression behavior of fibrin clots by accounting for micro-buckling of fibers using a double-well energy landscape.

Prashant Purohit is a professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics at the University of Pennsylvania. He got his PhD at Caltech in 2002 and after a few years of postdoctoral work he joined the faculty at Penn in 2006. His interests are in phase transitions, statistical mechanics and biophysics. His current research is focused on the mechanics of blood clots and the mechanics of DNA and lipid membranes.

Feb
11
Thu
Seminar: Prof. Daria Terekhov, Concordia University
Feb 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

More information coming soon!

Feb
18
Thu
Seminar: Prof. Paris Perdikaris, University of Pennsylvania
Feb 18 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

More information coming soon!

Feb
25
Thu
Seminar: Prof. Jamie Padgett, Rice University
Feb 25 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Multi-Hazard Risks in Coastal Industrial Regions 

Jamie E. Padgett
Stanley C. Moore Endowed Chair and Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University

NON-JHU PARTICIPANTS – RSVP to attend by visiting https://forms.gle/Fq5tSd3jpEJ3MML89

Many coastal communities are co-located and intrinsically interwoven with industrial development, including ports, chemical plants, or oil and gas operations. While these industries are often strategically placed along the coast, their positioning alongside neighboring communities leaves them jointly susceptible to severe storm-induced hazards and their compound effects. This presentation poses multi-hazard risk assessment frameworks for a particular piece coastal industrial infrastructure–aboveground storage tanks (ASTs)–and probes the potential for damage, impact of mitigation, and cascading consequences within coastal industrial communities. Aboveground storage tanks offer bulk storage of hazardous materials, including a variety of fuels and chemicals, at industrial sites, and are susceptible to major damage during severe storms (e.g. flotation, overturning, buckling) resulting in spills into the environment or surrounding communities. New models of the fragility of ASTs subjected to multi-hazard storm conditions are proposed, considering storm surge, wave, wind, debris impacts, and rainfall loads. Scenario-based and probabilistic risk assessment frameworks are presented, using a case study in the Houston Ship Channel region. This work uncovers new insights on the viability of procedural, structural and protective mitigation strategies, and enhanced understanding of the factors and conditions that affect risks to industrial infrastructure and surrounding communities in hurricane prone regions.

Jamie E. Padgett is the Stanley C. Moore Endowed Chair and Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University.  Padgett’s research focuses on risk assessment of structures and infrastructure, and the subsequent quantification of resilience and sustainability in the face of multiple hazards. Dr. Padgett, Fellow of the Structural Engineering Institute (2020), was the founding Chair of the ASCE/SEI technical committee on Multiple Hazard Mitigation, and currently serves on the leadership of the ASCE Technical Council on Life-Cycle Performance, Safety, Reliability, and Risk of Structural and Infrastructure Systems. She has received several awards and recognitions including EMI Objective Resilience Distinguished Lecturer (2019) and the ASCE Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize (2017). Padgett currently serves in leadership roles within the NIST Center of Excellence for Community Disaster Resilience and the NSF NHERI Cyberinfrastructure “DesignSafe-CI”.

Mar
4
Thu
Seminar: Prof. Chia-Ming Uang, Univ. of California, San Diego
Mar 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

More information coming soon!

Mar
10
Wed
Richard J. Carroll Memorial Lecture: Prof. Kara Kockelman, Univ. of Texas at Austin
Mar 10 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

The Richard J. Carroll Memorial Lectureship in Civil Engineering was established at Johns Hopkins University to commemorate one of Baltimore’s leading structural engineers. The lectureship has been endowed by the many friends and admirers of Richard Carroll, who died in 1982. That endowment contributes to the ongoing guest seminars in the Department of Civil and Systems Engineering and provides for these special lectures.

Richard J. Carroll received his bachelor of civil engineering degree from Villanova University in 1955. He studied advanced structural design at Johns Hopkins University and George Washington University. He was chief structural engineer for the firms of Knoerle, Bender, Stone, and Associates, and Ewell, Bomhardt and Associates, and chief field engineer for the Portland Cement Association. In 1964, he founded his own firm, Carroll Engineering, Inc., which grew to 26 employees under his leadership. Mr. Carroll published several papers dealing with concrete use and design, with emphasis on post-tensioned and pre-stressed concrete. He also taught courses in ultimate strength design and plastic design in steel. He belonged to numerous professional societies. His untimely death at the age of 49 left a legacy of professionalism, integrity, and vigor.

Mar
11
Thu
Seminar: Prof. Carrie Chan, Columbia Business School
Mar 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

More information coming soon!

Mar
18
Thu
Seminar: Prof. Curt Bronkhurst, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Mar 18 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

More information coming soon!

Apr
1
Thu
Seminar: Prof. Roger Ghanem, University of Southern California
Apr 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

More information coming soon!

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